॥१॥ समाधिपाद - 1.Samādhi Pāda - Contemplation



results: 11 - 20 of 51 from chapter 1

  • 1.11 : अनुभूतविषयासंप्रमोषः स्मृतिः॥११॥
  • 11. Anubhūta viṣayāsaṁpramoṣaḥ smṛtiḥ.
  • Memory is not allowing mental impressions to escape.
  • Memory is a modification of consciousness allowing one to recapitulate past experiences. Memory is the collection of the modulations and impressions of accurate knowledge, perverse knowledge, illusory knowledge and sleep. As perception changes, memory too may vary, but when correctly used, it enables one to recall experiences in their true, unspoiled state. This ability is the groundwork of the practice of discrimination.  The five properties of consciousness can be equated with the five fluctuations of consciousness - dullness with nidra, negligence with viparyaya, agitation with vikalpa, one-pointed ness with smrti and self-discipline or control with pramana.   Dream is a form of ripple which in the waking state is called memory.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 1.12 : अभ्यासवैराग्याभ्यां तन्निरोधः॥१२॥
  • 12. Abhyāsa vairāgyābhyām tannirodhaḥ.
  • Practice and detachment are the means to still the movements of consciousness.    
  • The mind, to have this non-attachment, must be clear, good and rational.   Each action is like the pulsations quivering over the surface of the lake. The vibration dies out, and what is left? The Samskaras, the impressions. When a large number of these impressions is left on the mind they coalesce, and become a habit. It is said “habit is second nature;” it is first nature also, and the whole nature of man; everything that we are, is the result of habit. The Samskara is left by these vibrations passing out of our mind, each one of them leaving its result. Our character is the sum-total of these marks, and according as some particular wave prevails one takes that tone. Our sould has impressions of the past life too, which present itself as phobias All the bad habits that have left their impressions are to be controlled by good habits. Go on doing good, thinking holy thoughts continuously; that is the only way to suppress base impressions. Never say any man is hopeless, because he only represents a character, a bundle of habits, and these can be checked by new and better ones. Character is repeated habits,and repeated habits alone can reform character. Mental strength must be garnered, to achieve detachment and freedom from desires. Abhyasa expresses the sense of mechanical repetition, while anusthana connotes devotion, dedication and a religious attitude. Repeated effort made with an in-depth understanding of the art and philosophy of yoga and with perfect communion of body, mind and soul is not a mechanical practice, but a religious and spiritual one. Practice is the path of evolution - detachment and renunciation the path of involution. Practice is demanded in all the eight limbs of yoga. Evolutionary practice is the forward march towards discovery of the Self, necessitating yama, niyama, asana and pranayama. The involutionary path of renunciation necessitates pratyahara, dharana, dhyana and samadhi. This inward journey disengages the consciousness from external objects. To be proficient in yoga, yama and niyama must be observed carefully all through the yogic sadhana. This is abhyasa. The casting away of ideas and actions which obstruct progress in sadhana is named vairagya. As it is known, consciousness becomes involved with the objects perceived, and identifies with them, taking the seer with it. Then the seer becomes subordinate to the vacillating mind. . Vairagya is a practice through which the sadhaka learns to be liberated from desires and passions and to encourage non-attachment to things, which holds back his pursuit of union with the soul.

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  • 1.13 : तत्र स्थितौ यत्नोऽभ्यासः॥१३॥
  • 13. Tatra sthitau yatno’bhyāsaḥ.
  • Practice is the unfaltering effort to still these fluctuations.
  • Practice is the effort to quieten the fluctuations in the consciousness and then to move towards silencing it - to accomplish a constant, balanced, tranquil state of mind.    In order to free the mind from fluctuations and vacillations and to reach a state of stability, the sadhaka is advised to intensely practise all the yogic principles, from yama to dhyana. These encompass every discipline - moral, ethical, physical, mental, intellectual and spiritual. Being in the zone is a state of mind—where you are free of thinking and negative emotions. Such people are beyond the boundaries of human ego, and feel that they are part of something larger, where the laws of the physical world cease to exist, transcending the condition of being human. All trust their instincts and intuition to do the right thing at the right time, without reasoning or analysing. The game comes to you and not you going to the game. Arjun saw only the eye of the fish, at Draupadi swayamvar —at that time the activity in the neocortex ceases and there is no thinking. The cerebellum takes over at that point. When the frontal lobe is activated you have focus, clarity, decisiveness, concentration, pro activeness and individuality.

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  • 1.14 : स तु दीर्घकालनैरन्तर्यसत्कारासेवितो दृढभूमिः॥१४॥
  • 14. Sa tu dīrgha kāla nairantarya satkārāsevito dṛḍhabhūmiḥ.
  • Long, uninterrupted, alert practice is the firm establishment for restraining the fluctuations.
  • Restraint does not come in one day, but by long continued practice. Insightful wisdom is acquired through unfaltering, dedicated, attentive practice, and non-attachment through applied restraint. However, success may bloat the sadhak's ego, and he should be careful not to become a victim of intellectual pride, which may drag him away from enlightenment. He must use his own discrimination, so that humility replaces pride and spiritual wisdom dawns. Knowing how to be in the flow, gives athletes the winning edge. Sports psychology is all about knowing how to trigger this state. You know what has to be done, and you are doing it. You are engaged by the challenge , but NOT overwhelmed. You find a good match between the demands of the situation and your own innate ability.

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  • 1.15 : दृष्टानुश्रविकविषयवितृष्णस्य वशीकारसंज्ञा वैराग्यम्॥१५॥
  • 15. Dṛṣṭānuśravika viṣaya vitṛṣṇasya vaśīkāra saṁjñā vairāgyam.
  • Desirelessness towards the seen and the unseen gives the consciousness of mastery.
  • A bird cannot fly with one wing.  It requires two wings to fly. To reach the highest spiritual goal, the two wings of yoga, abhyasa ( practice ) and vairagya (dispassion ) are mandatory. Non-attachment and detachment must be learned through willpower. They consist of learning to be free from yearnings - not only for worldly, but also heavenly pleasures. Citta is taught to stay impassive towards thoughts of craving and passion, and to remain in a state of pure consciousness, free of all objects and free even from the qualities of sattva, rajas and lamas. The mind is regarded by the sages as the 11th sense. The eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin are the five senses of perception. Arms, legs, mouth, reproductive and excretory organs are the five organs of action. These are the external senses; mind is an internal sense organ. There are five stages in vairagya - 1.Releasing the senses from enjoyment of their objects, and controlling them, is yatamana. As it is not possible to control all the senses at a time, one should endeavour to control them one by one to attain domination over them all. 2.By thoughtful control, one burns away the desires which blocks citta's movement towards the soul. This is vyatireka. 3.When the five senses of perception and five organs of action have been detached away from contact with objects, the faintest desires remain in a causal state and are felt only in the mind - this is known as ekendriya. The mind wants to play a dual role - to satisfy the desires of the senses, and also to experience Self-Realisation. Once the senses have been stilled, the mind moves with one-pointed effort towards Soul Realisation. 4.     Vasikara is achieved when one has gotten over all hungrinesses, and has developed stolidity to all types of attachment, non-attachment and detachment. All eleven senses have been subdued. 5.     From these develops paravairagya, the highest form of renunciation - it is free from the qualities of sattva, rajas and lamas. On coming upon this state, the sadhaka ceases to be concerned with himself, or with others who remain caught in the entanglement of pleasures. Often one comes across renounced people who get caught in the pleasures and comforts of life and neglect their sadhana. One should learn from such examples and guard themselves, so that one develops firmness in one's own sadhana. We observe that the mind runs toward the objects of its attachment, toward the direction it has been habituated to running in the past. The elimination of attachment eradicates the unnecessary wanderings of the mind. The things that used to afford you delight before give you displeasure now. That is a sign of Vairagya. As soon as Vairagya arises in the mind, it opens the gate of Divine Wisdom. No true and lasting satisfaction comes from the enjoyment of worldly pleasures. Yet, people rush headlong towards objects, even when they know full well that the objects they are trying to seize are unreal and that the world in which they live is fraught with miseries of all sorts. This is Maya. When the mind rests in Atma then the only Nitya-Tripti, or eternal satisfaction comes. Attachment is the first child of Maya. The whole Lila of brahmAn Lord is being kept up by the force of attachment only. Vairagya does not mean abandoning social duties and responsibilities of life. It does not mean detachment from the world. It does not mean a life in  solitary caves. That man who has perfect mental detachment while remaining in the world is a hero indeed. A dispassionate man has a different mind altogether. He identifies himself every moment of his life with the witnessing consciousness that is present in pleasure and in pain, in joy and in sorrow, in censure and in praise, in honour and in dishonour, in all states of life. He stands adamantine as a peak amid a turbulent storm, as a spectator of this wonderful world show. He is not a bit affected by these pleasant and painful experiences. He learns several valuable lessons from them. He has, in other words, no attraction for pleasant objects and repulsion for painful ones. Nor is he afraid of pain. He knows quite well that pain helps a lot in his spiritual progress and evolution, in his long journey towards the Goal. He stands convinced that pain is the best teacher in the world. If you develop keen Vairagya, if you subdue your senses, and shun all enjoyments and pleasures of this worthless world, mixed as they are with pain, sin, fear, craving, miseries, disease, old age and death then nothing can really tempt you in this world. You will become proof against all temptations. You will have eternal peace, and infinite joy. You have no use for lust. Abhyās means practice, or a concerted and persistent effort to change an old habit or develop a new one. The term vairāgya appears three times in the Bhagavad Gita (6.35, 13.8, 18.52) where it is recommended as a key means for bringing control to the restless mind.

    श्रीभगवानुवाच |
    असंशयं महाबाहो मनो दुर्निग्रहं चलम् |
    अभ्यासेन तु कौन्तेय वैराग्येण च गृह्यते || 35||

    śhrī bhagavān uvācha
    asanśhayaṁ mahā-bāho mano durnigrahaṁ chalam
    abhyāsena tu kaunteya vairāgyeṇa cha gṛihyate


    BG 6.35: Lord Krishna said: O mighty-armed son of Kunti, what you say is correct; the mind is indeed very difficult to restrain. But by practice and detachment, it can be controlled.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 1.16 : तत्परं पुरुषख्यातेर्गुणवैतृष्ण्यम्॥१६॥
  • 16. Tat param Puruṣa khyāter guṇavaitṛṣṇyam.
  • The ultimate renunciation is when one transcends the qualities of nature and perceives the soul.
  • The whole of nature consists of three qualities; one is called Tamas, another Rajas and the third Sattva. These three qualities manifest themselves in the physical world as attraction / creation, repulsion / destruction , and control/ mediation ( done by Brahma/ Vishnu/ Shiva ) . Everything that is in nature, all these manifestations, are combinations and recombinations of these three forces. This is the bedrock of Dvaita Vedanta—dance of opposites controlled by a mediator ( preserver ) . If through abhyasa one can activate and purify one's energy, through vairagya one can disinvolve oneself from involvement in even the subtlest manifestations of the phenomenal world. The creation of energy alone, without control or restraint, cannot lead to freedom. Here, one sees the unfolding of nature from its noumenal (alihga) state into the lihga state, through mahat; then from the non-specific (aviiesa) phenomena, including ahamkara, ego or 'I-consciousness' to the manifest (visesa) expressions of nature, which forms the foundation of one's experience of everyday reality. The reverse or involutionary process, which is the path of yoga, can be seen as the ascension of a ladder. Abhyasa furnishes one the necessary impulse for the rise; by vairagya one draws up the ladder behind them. When that mental desire has faded away, years later, the body cells may spontaneously rekindle attachment. This sutra relates to the ultimate freedom achieved through paravairagya - here phenomenal nature ceases to exist, as the gunas are transcended, drawn back into their noumenal root. By transcending the gunas, one unlocks that which binds one to nature. When this is achieved in all the involvements, the soul is fully perceived. The consciousness has now, by the power of wisdom, gained everything that had to be acquired, and tossed away everything that had to be discarded. The sadhaka is liberated from all bondage; there is no feeling of birth and death. Kaivalya is accomplished. This is the effect of the twin disciplines of abhyasa and vairagya, through which the sadhaka turns wise and free, untarnished by the influence of citta. Prasahkhyana, means 'highest knowledge', purusakhyati, means 'perception of the soul'.

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  • 1.17 : वितर्कविचारानन्दास्मितारूपानुगमात् संप्रज्ञातः॥१७॥
  • 17. Vitarka vicārānandāsmitānugamāt saṁprajñātaḥ.
  • Cognitive meditation is accompanied by reasoning, discrimination, bliss and the sense of 'I am.'
  • Four types of awareness develop through practice and detachment.  Absorption of the consciousness, achieved through engrossment in conjecture, inference and analytical study; synthesis, consideration and discrimination; bliss or elation; and a state of pure being, make up samprajnata samadhi.  Samprajnata samadhi consists of vitarka, engrossment in analysis, vicar - engrossment in reasoning, ananda - experiencing a state of bliss, and asmita - experiencing the state of 'I'. Vitarka is an act of involvement by calculated thinking and study, which leads to the ultimate point or root cause. It is an attempt to differentiate the cause from the effect, a process of astute experimental research from the gross to the subtle. Intellectual analysis, vitarka samprajnataIt is further divided into deliberation, savitarka and non-deliberation, nirvitarka. Vicara stands for differentiating knowledge. It is a process of investigation, reflection and consideration through which the straying conjectural brain is silenced and the sadhaka develops mental depth, acuteness, refinement and subtlety. Vicara too is sub-divided into reasoning, savicara and non-reasoning, nirvicara. As the growing body of experience conveys maturity, fulfilment is reached and a state of ecstasy, ananda, results, liberating the sadhaka from the mechanism of study, investigation and fulfilment and leading him to dwell in the self alone. This state is called asmita riipa samprajnata samadhi. Therefore, all six gradations of sabija samadhi (samadhi with support or seed) - savitarka, nirvitarka, savicara, nirvicara, ananda and asmita - are explained. There is a 7th stage of samadhi, virama pratyaya, so called asamprajhdta samadhi, and an 8th, called dharma megha or nirbija samadhi. As external objects are vulnerable to change, deliberation might not be pure. One should go from the fringe to the source. Vicara is beyond vitarka, ananda is beyond vitarka and vicara, and asmita is beyond vitarka, vicara and ananda. This is the steady progress from the gross body towards the subtle mind, and from the subtle mind towards the source, the nucleus of being. Savitarka and nirvitarka samadhi belong to the function of the brain, and are achieved by rumination on gross elements and objects cognisable through the senses. Savicara and nirvicara samadhi belong to the territory of the mind and are achieved by contemplation of subtle elements, and ananda belongs to the territory of mature intelligence. Ananda must be assigned not to the senses, but to pure wisdom. Contemplation by the self of the self helps shed ego.. It is assumed that the front of the brain is the analytical part (savitarka), while the back of the brain is the old, reasoning area (savicara). The base of the brain is the seat of ananda, and the crown of the head of the individual self, asmita. Sabija samadhi is accomplished by drawing these four facets of the brain towards its stem. When this synchronisation has been attained, a passing state of quietness, manolaya, is experienced. Then, from the stem of the brain, consciousness is made to fall towards the source mind, the seat of the heart. Here it unites into a mindless, beginningless, endless state of being - amanas-katva, or nirbija samadhi (samadhi without seed or support). It is the conquest of the spirit. In between sabija and nirbija samadhis, Patanjali traces an intervening state, virama pratyaya, which others call asamprajnata samadhi. It is a spiritual plateau (manolaya), a passing state or a resting place before one dives into nirbija samadhi. Through practice and renunciation each and every part of human - the skin, the cells, the breath, the motions of thought, intelligence and reason become acquainted with the self. This is known as samprajnata samadhi. The sadhaka's intelligence spreads equally within and around his body, similar to the surface of a lake without ripples. Then he perceives things clearly. In this samprajnata samadhi or contemplation, the disparity between the seer and the seen stays on. For instance, the performance of an asana, or movements of breath pranayama at the outset, these are done at a physical level. As understanding intensifies, the body is imbued internally, its movements are connected with the intelligence, and the asana is apprehended as a single unit for all directions - front to back, top to bottom, side to side. It is absorbed and withheld by the body's intelligence for the soul to perceive. One learns that one's body is the bow, the asana is the arrow, and the target is the soul. When the asana is perfected, the target is hit - the field and the knower of the field are unified. The logic and reasoning of the asana are gratified, the sadhaka, having lost the consciousness of the asana and of his body, is one with himself. His asana, his breath, his effort and his very being are one with the millions of cells in his body. He has accomplished sasmita - the auspicious state of asmita. Patanjali generally addresses at several levels at once, therefore it is not unreasonable to explain vitarka, vicara, ananda and asmita in relation to asana.  As one's asanas mature, he or she reaches a stage when skin-consciousness proceeds towards the centre of being, and the centre radiates towards the fringe. Movement is both centripetal and centrifugal. This integrity fetches bliss - ananda. Eventually, when the conscious mechanism by which one considers and performs asana comes to an end, the process reaches a resting point. The asana then rests only in the inner self which is in poise - the only support is asmita. This Samadhi is divided into two varieties. One is called the Samprajnata, and the other the Asamprajnata. The Samprajnata is of four varieites. In this Samadhi come all the powers of controlling nature. The first variety is called the Savitarka, when the mind meditates upon an object again and again, by isolating it from other objects.  Knowledge is power, and as soon as we begin to know a thing we get power over it; so also, when the mind begins to meditate on the different elements it gains power over them. That sort of meditation where the external gross elements are the objects is called Savitarka. Tarka means question, Savitarka with-question. , in the very same meditation, when one struggles to take the elements out of time and space, and think of them as they are, it is called Nirvitarka, without-question. When the meditation goes a step higher, and takes the Tanmatras as its object, and thinks of them as in time and space, it is called Savichara, with-discrimination, and when the same meditation gets beyond time and space, and thinks of the fine elements as they are, it is called Nirvichara, without-discrimination. The next step is when the elements are given up, either as gross or as fine, and the object of meditation is the interior organ, the thinking organ, and when the thinking organ is thought of as bereft of the qualities of activity, and of dullness, it is then called Sanandam, the blissful Samadhi. In that Samadhi, when we are thinking of the mind as the object of meditation, before we have reached the state which takes us beyond the mind even, when it has become very ripe and concentrated, when all ideas of the gross materials, or fine materials, have been given up, and the only object is the mind as it is, when the Sattva state only of the Ego remains, but differentiated from all other objects, this is called Asmita Samadhi, and the man who has attained to this has attained to what is called in the Vedas “bereft of body.” He can think of himself as without his gross body; but he will have to think of himself as with a fine body. Those that in this state get merged in nature without attaining the goal are called Prakrtilayas, but those who do not even stop at any enjoyments, reach the goal, which is freedom.The higher spiritual knowledge of super consciousness is manifested by:•        Revelation, Recognition, Reflection, Realization. Samadhi is super conscious state - an eighth limb of Asthanga Yoga system of epistemology as the final destination- appears to have multiple stages in progression like:   Savitarka,  Nirvitarka,  Savikalpa,  Nirvikalpa and eventually Sahaja state.  Merging in Reality and remaining unaware of the world is Nirvikalpa Samadhi ( Nirbija Samadhi).. (The mind is alive but merged in light, like a bucket with rope lowered into a well that can be drawn out again).   In Raja Yoga, nirvikalpa samadhi is a synonym for Asamprajnata Samadhi, the highest stage of samadhi. Nirvikalpa samādhi, absorption without self-consciousness, is a mergence of the mental activity (cittavṛtti) in the Self, to such a degree, or in such a way, that the distinction (vikalpa) of knower, act of knowing, and object known becomes dissolved — as waves vanish in water, and as foam vanishes into the sea.    Without seeds or Samskaras -all the seeds or impressions are burnt by the fire of knowledge--all the Samskaras and Vasanas which bring on rebirths are totally freed up. All Vrittis or mental modifications that arise from the mind-lake come under restraint. The five afflictions, viz., Avidya (ignorance), Asmita (egoism), Raga-dvesha (love and hatred) and Abhinivesha (clinging to life) are destroyed and the bonds of Karma are annihilated . It gives Moksha (deliverance from the wheel of births and deaths). With the advent of the knowledge of the Self, ignorance vanishes. With the disappearance of the root-cause, viz., ignorance, egoism, etc., also disappear. When you enter into nirvikalpa samadhi, the first thing you feel is that your heart is larger than the universe itself. Ordinarily you see the world around you, and the universe seems infinitely larger than you are. But this is because the world and the universe are perceived by the limited mind. When you are in nirvikalpa samadhi, you see the universe as a tiny dot inside your vast heart. In nirvikalpa samadhi there is infinite bliss. Nirvikalpa samadhi is the highest samadhi . One cannot operate in the world while in that state of consciousness.  Nirvikalpa Samadhi is the culmination of all practices that are Spiritual. Nirvikalpa Samadhi is the perfect flowering of a Human Being. After attaining the state of Nirvikalpa Samadhi, one can disseminate the Cosmic wisdom to one and all. One becomes the authorized representative of BrahmAn (the Creator) on Earth. Truth and only truth is what you hear from such a learned one. In the stage of Nirvikalpa Samadhi one feels so nearer to God the Creator ... all else becomes secondary and loses meaning. Some may be willing to part with whatever they have ... All that for a darshan (glimpse) of brahmAn. Nirvikalpa means "free from all sorts of modifications and imaginations." The mind completely melts in Brahman. In Nirvikalpa samadhi there is no thought, no idea, nothing whatsoever. All is tranquility, or you can say tranquillity’s flood. Here nature’s dance comes to an end.  It lasts a few days, and then one has to come down. When one comes down,  one forgets his own name ... Remaining in the primal, pure natural state without effort is Sahaja Nirvikalpa Samadhi.( the mind is dead , resolved into the Self, like a river discharged into the ocean - its identity lost - and which can never be re-directed from the ocean, once discharged into it). When Alexander the Great came to India . his soldiers were totally psyched to see sages in deep states of Samadi, with cobras clambering all over them attracted by the vibes. The battle was lost there itself.

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  • 1.18 : विरामप्रत्ययाभ्यासपूर्वः संस्कारशेषोऽन्यः॥१८॥
  • 18. Virāma pratyayābhyāsa pūrvaḥ saṁskāraśeṣo’nyaḥ.
  • There is another meditation which is attained by the practice of alert mental suspension until only subtle impressions remain.
  • Patanjali suggests another state of samadhi in between sabija samadhi and nirbija samadhi, but does not name it. It is experienced with the termination of all functions of the brain, leaving behind only the residual merits, or samskaras, of good practices. In this state one is liberated from passions, wants and appetites. The word used for this state is 'virama pratyaya'. In it, the sadhaka rests in a highly evolved state in which the intelligence is silent. The moment one loses the feeling of 'I', one is in this state of virama pratyaya, which is neither negative nor positive. It is a state of suspended animation in the consciousness. Patanjali refers to this state as a different type of samadhi (anyah). It is not deliberate but natural. In deliberate or samprajnata samadhi, the intelligence dissolves, but the sense of self stays on. The samskaras of good practices remain and all other fluctuations terminate. This state becomes a plateau, from which the aspirer may climb further up the spiritual ladder. As it is only a passing state, one must take care that stagnation does not set in - it should not be taken as the ultimate. One should then, in fact, step up one's sadhana to attain the state of the absolute, nirbija samadhi. Those who remain in virama pratyaya not only conquer the elements of nature, but merge in them, while others live without a physical body .You can remain in that state for a long period without the awareness of their bodies, but emerged later to reach nirbija samadhi. Such sadhakas are called prakrtilayas (laya = merged in nature) or videhins (existing without a body). Virama pratyaya is a perilous state. It may bind the sadhaka forever, or it may uplift him. Patanjali advises in that those who have reached virama pratyaya should not stop there, but should escalate their efforts with faith and courage, memory and contemplative awareness. This is the perfect superconscious Asamprajnata Samadhi, the state which gives us freedom. It is very difficult to attain, although its method seems very easy. Its method is to hold the mind as the object, and whenever through comes, to strike it down, allowing no thought to come into the mind, thus making it an entire vacuum. When we can really do this, in that moment we shall attain liberation. . When this state, Asamprajnata, super-consciousness, is reached, the Samadhi becomes seedlessIn that sort of concentration when there is consciousness, where the mind has succeeded only in quelling the waves in the Chitta and holding them down, they are still there in the form of tendencies, and these tendencies (or seeds) will become waves again, when the time comes. But when you have destroyed all these tendencies, almost destroyed the mind, then it has become seedless, there are no more seeds in the mind out of which to manufacture again and again this plant of life, this ceaseless round of birth and death. Asamprajnata Samadhi brings Kaivalya (liberation )- the mind is  perfectly steady. All Samskaras are fried up. There is perfect awareness. This is a stage where a Yogi gets the highest knowledge. There is Prajna or pure consciousness. This is the state like ocean without waves. When there is Ekagrata, Samprajnata Samadhi is possible. Asamprajnata Samadhi is possible when there is perfect Nirodha of mind. Para Vairagya brings complete rest to the mind. All Vrittis stop. In Samprajnata Samadhi there is only a partial inhibition of mental functions. Asamprajnata Samadhi destroys the impressions of all antecedent mental functions, and even goes so far as to tide over even Prarabdha. A Yogi has no Prarabdha at all. The mind having no object to grasp, becomes as it were, non-existent. This is Nirbija or Niralambana Samadhi.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 1.19 : भवप्रत्ययो विदेहप्रकृतिलयानाम्॥१९॥
  • 19. Bhavapratyayo videha prakṛtilayānām.
  • In this state, one may experience bodilessness, or become merged in unitive consciousness
  • In this samadhi, which is balanced between labija and nirbija samadhi, the sadhaka is liberated from all fluctuations, but subliminal impressions, samskaras, bounce to life the moment he comes out of that state.  Some evolved entities become absorbed in the elements of nature. Caught in the mesh of bodiless feeling, or unifying in nature, they forget to climb to the topmost rung of the spiritual ladder, and fail to reach nirbija samadhi. The sadhaka, having reached a state of isolation but not emancipation, must come out of it if he does not wish to lose the path of kaivalya. One whose soul moves without a body is a videhin.. Levitation is NOT about the human body floating up, but an out of body flight experience. This experience is the conquering of the principles or tattvas of nature - prakrtijaya. The turiya consciousness is the transcendental Reality. It is not a form of Samadhi in the accurate sense of the term. When an individual soul establishes permanent and constant union with Supreme Being, we say that he is enjoying the Turiya consciousness. Here the seeker reaches the absolute height of evolution. The soul now has the highest frequency of brahmAn, the mother field.  Patanjali defines sleep as a state in which all thoughts and feelings are temporarily suspended, and the senses, mind, intellect and consciousness rest in the being. In dreamless sleep, there is absence of everything. If an average person, when awake, recalls the state of dreamless sleep, he glimpses a non-physical state of existence (videha) and also the state of unifying with nature (prakrtilaya).. Sleep is a natural condition of consciousness; samadhi is a super-conscious state. In deep sleep one is dead to world but Samadhi one has added dimension of being awakened to Brahman while being metaphorically dead to world. If deep sleep is undifferentiated darkness then Samadhi is undifferentiated illumination. In sleep, everything is inert, tamasic; in samadhi everything is luminous, untainted by the gunas.

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  • 1.20 : श्रद्धावीर्यस्मृतिसमाधिप्रज्ञापूर्वक इतरेषाम्॥२०॥
  • 20. Śraddhāvīryasmṛtisamādhiprajñāpūrvaka itareṣām.
  • For others, clarity is preceded by faith, energy, memory and discrimination of the real.
  • Highly evolved souls have the power to differentiate between isolation and emancipation. They are neither elated by their conquest of the elements, nor delighted at their ability to move unreservedly without their bodies. Sraddha should not be understood just as faith. It also expresses mental and intellectual firmness. (The next word, virya, stands for gallantry and power, in the sense of physical and nervine strength.) Interestingly, Patanjali's first use of the word sraddha is unambiguous, in order to encourage the sadhaka to step up his sadhana in order to reach the highest goal. The natural trust of the aspirer is confirmed by revelation and transformed into the faith, which imbues the consciousness of practicians in any field of art, science and philosophy. If trust is instinctive, faith is intuitional.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻