॥१॥ समाधिपाद - 1.Samādhi Pāda - Contemplation



results: 41 - 50 of 51 from chapter 1

  • 1.41 : क्षीणवृत्तेरभिजातस्येव मणेर्ग्रहीतृग्रहणग्राह्येषु तत्स्थतदञ्जनतासमापत्तिः॥४१॥
  • 41. Kṣīṇa vṛtter abhijātasyeva maṇer grahītṛ grahaṇa grāhyeṣu tatstha tadañjanatā samāpattiḥ.
  • When the agitations of the mind are under control, the mind becomes like a transparent crystal and has the power of becoming whatever form is presented- knower, act of knowing, or what is known.
  • Whenever a yogi meditates he can keep out all other thought; he becomes identified with that on which he mediates; when he meditates he is like a piece of crystal; before flowers the crystal becomes almost identified with flowers. If the flower is red, the crystal looks red, or if the  flower is blue , the crystal looks blue. With refinement, the consciousness becomes exceedingly sensitive, choiceless, untainted and chaste. The perceiver, the instrument of perception and the Perceived object, evidently reflected, are nothing but the seer. Like an object reflected immaculately on a clean mirror, the perceiver, the perceived and the instrument are reflected as one. This transparent reflecting quality of consciousness is termed samapatti, which means assumption of the original form of the seer. Patanjali's description of samapatti emphasises the subtle distinction between yoga, samadhi and samapatti. Yoga is the utilisation of the means to attain samadhi. Samadhi is profound meditation and total absorption. Samapatti is the equilibrised state of mind of the seer who, having attained samadhi, radiates his own pure state. Yoga and samadhi, in other words, can be looked upon as practices; samapatti stands for the state towards which they lead. When all the fluctuations of mind's sattvic, rajasic and tamasic nature reaches a culmination, mind quits to gather and convey information, and cilia is like the placid, clear water of a calm lake. It transforms itself to the level of the seer, and reflects its transparency without refraction. Like a transparent jewel, it becomes at once the knower, the instrument of knowing and the object known. Thus the sadhaka experiences the true state of the soul. Samapatti is enshrined in abhijatamani, which means faultless jewel. Citta is now a faultless jewel. By yogic discipline and contemplation, the sadhaka develops these intuitive qualities of transparency and honesty and realises the faultless quality of consciousness. Through it, he becomes the seer and emanates rays of wisdom through his words, thoughts and actions.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.42 : तत्र शब्दार्थज्ञानविकल्पैः संकीर्णा सवितर्का समापत्तिः॥४२॥
  • 42. Tatra śabdārtha jñāna vikalpaiḥ saṁkīrṇā savitarkā.
  • At this stage, called savitarka samapatti, the word, meaning and content are blended, and become special knowledge.
  • Sampathi is similar to Samadhi .  Samāpatti stands for correct (samyag) acquisition (āpatti) of Truth. It is a form of alaukika-pratyakṣa (extraordinary perception) forming thus a legitimate part of the perceptual (pratyakṣa]] instruments of adequate knowledge (pramāṇa). In the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, samapatti is discussed as the universal form of the Yoga called samprajñāta-samadhi, or savikalpa samadhi, followed by asamprajñāta-samadhi, or nirvikalpa samadhi.   It has as its prerequisite the annihilation of all (non-sattvic) modifications (vṛtti) of consciousness (citta). Savitarka meditation relates to concentration on a gross object while still accompanied with other activities of the mind. It involves the co-mingling of three things: the object itself, the word or name we give to the object, and knowledge related to the object. There are many different gross objects on which one might meditate at the Savitarka level. In the refined state of consciousness, words and their meanings are simultaneously and tunefully coalesced with understanding, so that consciousness becomes enwrapped in a new kind of knowledge. This is savitarka samapatti.   When you contemplate the whole universe as if it is in space and time, it is the lowest samadhi – savitarka. When you are struggling to obviate the interference of space and time and attack the universe as it is in itself, without any kind of association of space and time, that is nirvitarka samadhi, a higher state. Sound here means vibration; meaning, the nerve currents which conduct it; and knowledge, reaction. All the various meditations we have had so far, Patanjali calls Savitarka (meditations with reasoning). Later on he will give us higher and higher Dhyanas. In these that are called “with reasoning,” we keep the duality of subject and object, which results from the mixture of word, meaning, and knowledge. There is first the external vibration, the word; this, carried inward by the sense currents, is the meaning. After that there comes areactionary wave in the Chitta, which is knowledge, but the mixture of these three makeup what we call knowledge. In all the meditations up to this we get this mixture as object of meditation. The next Samadhi is higher.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.43 : स्मृतिपरिशुद्धौ स्वरूपशून्येवार्थमात्रनिर्भासा निर्वितर्का॥४३॥
  • 43. Smṛti pariśuddhau svarūpa śūnyevārtha mātra nirbhāsā nirvitarkā.
  • In nirvitarka samapatti, the difference between memory and intellectual illumination is disclosed; memory is cleansed and consciousness shines without reflection.
  • Nirvitarka is concentration on a gross object in which there are no longer any extraneous gross level activities in the mind because of the memory having been purified.  Notice that with Savitarka, there was not only meditation on the object, but also there were the other thought streams in the mind, though these were not distracting due to vairagya (non-attachment). Here, in Nirvitarka, these thought patterns have subsided.  When memory is completely purged and purified, mind too is purified. Both discontinue to function as distinct entities; a no-mind state is experienced, and consciousness alone expresses itself, shining untarnished without reflection of external objects.  Memory is the recapitulation of past thoughts and experiences. It is the storehouse of past impressions. Its knowledge is reflected knowledge. The sadhaka should be aware that memory has incredible impact on intelligence. By tenacity in yoga practices and persistent self-discipline, new experiences come to light. These new experiences, liberated from the memories of the past, are fresh, direct and subjective; they wipe out what is remembered. Then memory ceases to function as a separate entity. It either unites with consciousness or takes a secondary position, giving prevalence to new experiences and bringing precision in intelligence. For an average person memory is a past mind. For the enlightened man, memory is a present mind. As memory is purged, intelligence becomes illuminative and moves closer to the seer, losing its identity.Even for the unripened mind, there is a right and a wrong use of memory. It is not for recapitulating bliss, but for establishing a support of experience as a source for further accurate action and perception. In asana, for instance, one commences with trial and error. The fruits of these experiments are graded by the discriminating intelligence and stored in the memory. As one progresses, trial and error decreases, and correct perception increases. So memory provides foresight against error. Awareness, with discrimination and memory, breaks down bad habits, which are reiterated actions based on incorrect perception, and replaces them with their opposite. In this process the brain must be ingenious, not mechanical. The mechanical brain questions only the external occurrences, bringing objective knowledge. The creative brain questions the inner and outer, bringing subjective and spiritual knowledge. When awareness is associated with intelligence, honesty comes into being; when brain and body proceed in harmony, integrity prevails. In all this lengthy process of tapas, memory supports the building-up process. When memory works perfectly, it becomes one with the intelligence. When the sound comes, the senses vibrate, and the wave rises in reaction; they follow so closely upon one another that there is no discerning one from the other; when this meditation has been practiced for a long time, memory, the receptacle of all impressions, becomes purified, and wwe are able clearly to distinguish them from one another. This is called “Nirvitarka,” concentration without reasoning.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.44 : एतयैव सविचारा निर्विचारा च सूक्ष्मविषया व्याख्याता॥४४॥
  • 44. Etayaiva savicārā nirvicārā ca sūkṣmaviṣayā vyākhyātā.
  • The contemplation of subtle aspects is similarly explained as deliberate (savicara samapatti) or non-deliberate (nirvicara samapatti).
  • Beyond both Savitarka and Nirvitarka is Savichara. With Savichara, the gross thoughts (Vitarkas) have subsided, but there are still subtle thought patterns, which are called Vichara. Savitarka Samapatti and Savichara Samapatti are similar processes, though one is on gross thoughts, while the other relates to subtle thoughts. Nirvichara is concentration in which there are no longer any extraneous gross or subtle activities in the mind. This purity of mind comes through the processes of meditation and non-attachment. In Nirvichara Samapatti, the engrossed mind completely takes on the coloring of the subtle object of meditation, much like a pure crystal will take on the coloring of whatever color it is near. With increasing mastery of Nirvichara, the eternal Self begins to shine for the aspirant.  Transformation of the consciousness by contemplation on subtle objects like the ego (ahamkara), intelligence (buddhi) or the equivalent of the elements (sound, touch, sight, taste and smell), or the qualities of luminosity, vibrancy and dormancy of nature, conditioned by space, time and causation, is savicara samapatti. Without these reflections it becomes nirvicara samapatti.  In nirvicara samapatti, the sadhaka experiences a state without verbal deliberation. All the subtle objects reflected in savicara are eliminated. He is free from memory, free from past experiences, devoid of all past impressions. This new state of contemplation is without cause and effect, place or time. The inexpressible states of pure bliss (ananda) and pure self (sasmita) rise to the surface and are experienced by the sadhaka.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.45 : सूक्ष्मविषयत्वं चालिङ्गपर्यवसानम्॥४५॥
  • 45. Sūkṣma viṣayatvam cāliṅga paryavasānam.
  • The subtlest level of nature (prakrti) is consciousness. When consciousness dissolves in nature, it loses all marks and becomes pure.
  • The gross objects are only the elements, and everything manufactured out of them. The fine objects begin with the Tanmatras or fine particles. The organs, the mind, egoism, the mind-stuff (the cause of all manifestion) the equilibrium state of Sattva, Rajas and Tamas materials—called Pradhana (chief), Prakrti (nature), or Avyakta (unmanifest), are all included within the category of fine objects. The Purusa (the  Soul) alone is excepted from this definition. By exploring the understated particles of nature, the consciousness attains its destination. It is a state of complete termination of the fluctuations of the mind. That is the subtle, infinitesimal intelligence (mahat) of nature (prakrti). Prakrti and pradhana original or natural form of anything, nature; alihga, un-manifested form . . .. .Prakrti Pradhana primary or original matter, the first evolved source of the material world, that which is placed or set before, chief or principal thing (these are all liable to change, while the soul (purusa) is changeless) .   The subtlest of the infinitesimal principles of nature is the cosmic intelligence (mahat), which in an individual is transformed as the 'I' in a forceful, minute form, called asmita or the small self. Though the Self does not change, the small self brings about changes in a human being due to the influence of nature's qualities. The body is made up of the particles oi prakrti - from its outermost sheath, the body, to its innermost core, the deep Self. When the individual self, the 'I' is quieted down by yogic practices, prakrti has reached its end and unites with the Self. This is subjective experience, or subjective knowledge.  The sadhaka attains purity in buddki and ahamkara, the infinitesimal source or summit of nature, mula-prakrti. Here, the sadhaka has reached the juncture of Self-Realisation.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.46 : ता एव सबीजः समाधिः॥४६॥
  • 46. Tā eva sabījaḥ samādhiḥ.
  • These constitute seeded contemplations.
  • The states of samadhi described in the previous sutras are dependent on a support or seed, and are termed sabija.   The savitarka, nirvitarka, savicara, nirvicara, sananda and sasmita satnadhis are known as sabija (seeded or with seed) satnadhis.   Beyond both Savitarka and Nirvitarka is Savichara. With Savichara, the gross thoughts (Vitarkas) have subsided, but there are still subtle thought patterns, which are called Vichara. Savitarka Samapatti and Savichara Samapatti are similar processes, though one is on gross thoughts, while the other relates to subtle thoughts. Nirvichara is concentration in which there are no longer any extraneous gross or subtle activities in the mind. This purity of mind comes through the processes of meditation and non-attachment. In Nirvichara Samapatti, the engrossed mind completely takes on the coloring of the subtle object of meditation, much like a pure crystal will take on the coloring of whatever color it is near. With increasing mastery of Nirvichara, the eternal Self begins to shine for the aspirant. All the states of samapatti described in 1.17-19 and 1.42-45 are seeded satnadhis.  All these satnadhis are dependent on an object which includes the intelligence (buddhi) and the I principle (asmita). Their seed is the nucleus of the being, the only seedless seat in individuals. Asmita is a very fine level of individuality or ego, meaning the way thought impressions become colored by I-am-ness, so as to mistakenly think that this thought pattern or memory is related to me. Meditation on Asmita gradually reveals the individuality, standing alone, underneath all of the attractions, aversions, and fears. It is remarkable to note that the six samapattis mentioned so far belong to the functions of the brain. The source of analysis (savitarka) or absence of analysis (nirvitarka) is the frontal brain. For investigation and examination (savicara) or absence of them (nirvicara), the source is the back brain. The source of joy (ananda) is the base of the brain, and of individuality (asmita), the top of the brain.  Through the disciplines of yoga, the sadhaka transforms his attention from the gross to the subtle. When he reaches the summit of nature, the brain being a part of nature, he attains precision in controlling the modes of consciousness. He is able to stop all functions of the brain, deliberate and non-deliberate, at will. That is why it is termed samadhi with seed.  Whatever is dependent on nature for contemplation is seeded samapatti. The contemplation of the seer, who is the source of all seeds, is without support. Though both seer and nature are eternal, nature is changeable while the seer remains the same, irreversible, not dependent upon any support except his own self. That is why contemplation of the seer is seedless or supportless (mrbija) samadhi.  Similar to the petals of a lotus, which blossom forth as the sun rises, and closes as it sets, the petals of the brain retreat from the fringe to its source, its stem, or bud, and all its functions stop. This is commonly called asamprajnata samadhi. It is the threshold between sabija and mrbija samadhi. If the sadhaka remains on the threshold, he barely subdues the elements. If he falls back, he is caught in pleasures and pains. If he crosses over, he achieves freedom and beatitude.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.47 : निर्विचारवैशारद्येऽध्यात्मप्रसादः॥४७॥
  • 47. Nirvicāra vaiśāradye ‘dhyātma prasādaḥ.
  • From proficiency in nirvicara samapatti comes transparency. Sattva or luminosity flows undisturbed, kindling the spiritual light of the self.
  • In the state of nirvichara where deliberate argumentation, analysis, etc. cease, the logical function of the mind comes to an end and there is no deduction or induction process any longer – there is only direct visualisation. Here, the peace of the Self manifests itself. Where does it manifest itself? In the luminous condition attained through the meditation known as nirvichara. Prasadah is peace, serenity, tranquillity – complete self-absorption free from all distractions and rajasic agitation. The concentration “without reasoning” being purified, the Chitta becomes firmly fixed. When intelligence and consciousness, the substance of man, remains non-reflective, profound and unconditioned, the vehicles of the soul - the anatomical body, the organs of action, the senses of perception, the mind, intelligence and consciousness - are illuminated. Knowledge and understanding of the real state of the soul manifest in luminosity. Present is the reality. The past is finished, and the future doesn’t exist. When the Kundalini rises she elongates those thoughts and establishes in the center where there is complete thoughtless awareness. And spiritually you grow in that thoughtless awareness which  we call as Nirvichara Samadhi.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.48 : ऋतम्भरा तत्र प्रज्ञा॥४८॥
  • 48. Ṛtambharā tatra prajñā.
  • Therein is the faculty of supreme wisdom.
  • After attaining the pure, non-reflective samādhi, the Yogi gets “wisdom-filled-with-truth.” This is the meaning of ṛtambharā.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.49 : श्रुतानुमानप्रज्ञाभ्यामन्यविषया विशेषार्थत्वात्॥४९॥
  • 49. Śrutānumāna prajñābhyām anya viṣayā viśeṣārthatvāt.
  • The wisdom obtained in the higher states of consciousness is different from that obtained by inference and testimony as it refers to particulars.
  • Truth-bearing knowledge is first-hand, intuitive knowledge.  This wisdom is acquired by the means of insight. It is an exceptional, direct knowledge arising from the soul, not from the perception of the senses or from the ordinary understanding. Hence, it has an unusual property of its own. The knowledge that springs from one's inner self is intuitive knowledge. It is also known as 'listening to the inner voice'.  The sadhaka may be judged to be of a mature and cultured mind; his perceptions have an independent soundness requiring no verification from other sources. An ordinary man possesses free will in the sense that he experiences choice and must find his way by discrimination. The enlightened sadhaka, having left duality behind him, experiences only his own will, which surpasses the vacillations of choice. This is the intelligence of sattva in sattva. The idea is that we have to get our knowledge of ordinary objects by direct perception, and by inference therefrom, and from testimony of people who are competent. By “people who are competent,” the Yogis always mean the Rishis, or the Seers of the thoughts recorded in the Scriptures—the Vedas. According to them, the only proof of the Scriptures is that they were the testimony of competent persons, yet they say the Scriptures cannot take us to realisation. We can read all the Vedas, and yet will not realise anything, but when we practise their teachings, then we attain to that state which realises what the Scriptures say, which penetrates where reason cannot go, and where the testimony of others cannot avail. This is what is meant by this aphorism, that realization is real religion, and all the rest is only preparation—hearing lectures, or reading books, or reasoning, is merely preparing the ground; it is not religion. Intellectual assent, and intellectual dissent are not religion. The central idea of the Yogis is that just as we come in direct contact with the objects of the senses, so religion can be directly perceived in a far more intense sense. The truths of religion, as God and Soul, cannot be perceived by the external senses. I cannot see God with my eyes, nor can I touch Him with my hands, and we also know that neither can we reason beyond the senses. The whole scope of realisation, is beyond Newtonic sense perception. The Yogis say that man can go beyond his direct sense perception, and beyond his reason also. Man has in him the faculty, the power, of transcending his intellect even, and that power is in every being, every creature. By the practice of Yoga that power is aroused, and then man transcends the ordinary limits of reason, and directly perceives things which are beyond all reason. In Indian yoga, intuition is the single greatest tool .Intuition is soul guidance or the inner voice. Intuition helps you stay in the present, like what is advocated in the Bhagavat Gita. It has little to do with predicting the future. All the human senses are channels for intuition and every cell can be an antenna to receive information. Intuition is a gift of crisis--- It tells you the right thing to do when you don't have time to figure it all out. Intuits are able to see possibilities and alternatives that aren’t immediately apparent. Your inner knowing comes from first your instincts, second your intellect, and third from your intuition. Intuition is not pseudo-science . It is an essential psychological function like thinking, feeling and sensing. The divining power of intuition comes from our inner self. It arises from very rapid processing of bits of information that are stored in our subconscious. Intuition thinks in terms of metaphor, feelings, pictures, and the spatial whole and doesn't fit neatly into the cause-and-effect model. Your intuition will not force you to do things that are truly wrong for yourself or other people in contradiction with the laws of the universe. Intuition is listening to the inner voice or heeding the promptings from within. Intuition is a ability to cut through the thickness of surface reality.  Your sub-conscious which operates a dozen times faster than your conscious mind has picked up on signals that your conscious mind has not yet processed. We function through partial information, and intuition gives us an overview, a whole sense of things. The divining power of intuition comes from our inner self-- very rapid processing of bits of information that are stored in our subconscious. We cannot command our gut feeling to use it at will. It just surfaces spontaneously when certain circumstances are present. Intuitive insights suddenly appear as ideas or feelings. Intuitive decisions are NOT guesswork . Intuition has an important role to play in decision making . Intuition is not limited to opinions but can encompass the ability to know valid solutions to problems. Intuition usually shows up in the areas where you have passion and talent. By logic that we prove, by intuition we discover. Intuition is a sudden and inexplicable knowing. It lies at the roots of spontaneity, humor, creativity, inspiration, and even genius. Intuition has its own unique language for communicating with you through touch, sight, taste, sound, and smell. As you pay attention to your senses, you’ll begin to understand the “vocabulary” of your intuition. Mental static and EGO can get in the way of tapping into intuition. Intuition bubbles up from within and can be overwhelmed by old mental or emotional "tapes" . Intuition gone wild becomes “jumping to conclusions”. By going too far out on a limb , you risk misinterpreting the situation and start harming others. Intuition should not be overused. So what exactly is intuition? It is the messages from your unconscious mind making contact with your consciousness. . The uncanny ability to detect patterns in the world around us, and to extrapolate larger truths . Use it always, never ignore it. By listening to what our heart and soul tells us to do - and then doing it - we can take ourselves anywhere we have ever dreamed of going. Your consciousness only uses a tiny proportion of your brainpower and your intuition accesses the residual power and communicates to your consciousness the bank of wisdom and knowledge it has available. This is done subtly through thoughts, feelings, sensations, images, sounds or any combination of them. Just as animals have a natural survival instinct so humans are born with the natural ability to be intuitive; your human instinct. Intuitive insights motivate us to grow closer to the creative source, thereby igniting our own creative spark and expression, which is the essence of our true self. When you feel excited about something, that's a hint about what to pursue. Decisions are made in the mind—choices are made in the gut.  Choices come from your essence and attunement to your higher self.

    ༺ ॐ ༻



  • 1.50 : तज्जः संस्कारोऽन्यसंस्कारप्रतिबन्धी॥५०॥
  • 50. Tajjaḥ saṁskāro’nya saṁskāra pratibandhī.
  • A new life begins with this truth-bearing light. Previous impressions are left behind and new ones are prevented.
  • When the power of the intellect springs from passionate insight, that insight neutralises all previous residues of action, movement and impression. Vritti (whirlpool, thought-wave) arises in the mind-ocean. It operates for sometime. Then it sinks below the threshold of normal consciousness. From the surface of the conscious mind wherein it was uppermost for some time, it sinks down deep into the region of the subconscious mind (Chitta). There, it continues to be a subliminal action and becomes a Samskara (impression). A conscious action-whether cognitive, affective or conative-assumes a potential and hidden (Sukshma and Avyakta) form just below the threshold of consciousness. This is termed a Samskara. The Samskaras (impressions) are embedded in the subconscious mind or Chitta. The past is preserved even to the minutest detail. Even a bit is never lost. When the fine Samskaras come up to the surface of the conscious mind back again as a big wave, when the past Vritti comes back to the surface of the conscious mind again by recollection, it is called memory or Smriti. No memory is possible without the help of Samskara. A Samskara of an experience is formed or developed in the Chitta at the very moment that the mind is experiencing something. There is no gap between the present experience and the formation of a Samskara in the subconscious mind. A specific experience leaves a specific Samskara. The memory of this specific experience springs from that particular Samskara only, which was formed out of that particular experience. New samskaras may continue to come forth due to the vacillations of the mind, and this may obstruct real knowledge. These mental impressions must be supervened upon by the power of discrimination, and then all doubts fade away. When doubts are cleared, the sadhaka has to dispose off even this discriminative knowledge. The new illuminating wisdom is free from doubts and discriminations; it blazes forth, a shimmering beacon of knowledge. The only way of attaining to that super-consciousness is by concentration, and we have also seen that what hinder the mind from concentration are the past Samskaras, impressions. Brain is not capable of distinguishing between reality and memory—the same neurons are sparked when we see something as when we merely remember it. Brain cannot distinguish between an image of experience and one of vivid imagination. When a person is in coma , anastesia, narco serum, shock, seizure or sleeping—the subconscious minds are wide open. Anything that will be said in their presence will be accepted by the spirit which will begin carrying it out.  Any passing comment or trivial statements can have a devastating effect on our subconscious mind because it is not argumentative or analytical. It accepts all statements directly on the face value. Even prayers and beliefs are positive signals which we give to our subconscious mind as something acceptable and true. The subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between a real experience and one that you vividly imagine. You can fool it or condition it. The subconscious mind does not think—it is only a store house of our experience. It has no sense of time. It cannot differentiate between positive and negative input. It cannot tell the difference between real and imagines experience. The conscious mind can be engaged 100% in talking or deep thinking while the subconscious keeps the car on the road. The conscious and subconscious minds are connected through a filter. So we cant read the contents of our subconscious mind. Subconscious, mental activities within an individual proceed without his awareness. Dreams and slips of the tongue are concealed examples of unconscious content too threatening to be confronted directly.  When the situation demands we are able to use the subconscious memory to the full extent—but only in relation to the specific problem. The conscious mind has limited memory. The subconscious mind has unlimited memory. Subconscious mind never sleeps even in a coma. the Subconscious has a tendency to accept what it imagines as real.  Every experience we have ever had is impressed somewhere in the electrochemical cells in our brain. The brain records every thing—every thing senses by our 5 senses—and it is imprinted in the brain cells for ever. Whenever something reactivates those cells we get a mental picture duplicating the original experience. The picture in our mind has an impact on every cell in our bodies. Thinking is not an action of the mind , but an action of our entire body. Tell your subconscious what you want repeatedly and it will produce it. You can call this visualization or intention.  The subconscious has a perfect memory. Every thing you have experienced using your 5 senses is part of the permanent memory of the subconscious mind, which never sleeps The subconscious mind acts on old beliefs stored over a lifetime. Many of those beliefs you may have accepted without thinking. Or you may have absorbed them when you were too young to exercise choice. Subconscious mind has a memory of 100 trillion images, all our experiences, emotions and feelings are stored as an image or a sound in a digitised manner . Data that cannot be recalled are retained in the subconscious. A person may be unconscious of ever having been locked in a closet as a child, yet under hypnosis he may recall the experience vividly. Negative suggestions with growing children gets rooted in their subconscious mind and is reflected later in their behavior.  During hypnosis –our conscious mind goes into a trance and suggestions are given directly to the subconscious mind, which cannot argue but accepts the suggestion at its face value. We do self hypnosis unknowingly several times an a day while doing our day to day activities. This is how our body learns to relax otherwise we would die of stress at a very early age. Any monotonous sequence of events make it boring for the brain and eventually it starts producing a hormone called Serotin which induces a drowsy state of mind.  There are samakaras of past life on the soul which causes phobias in current life.  They can be dissolved by meditation . A child is born with his Samskaras. A child is born with his past experiences transmuted into mental and moral tendencies and powers. By experiences, pleasant and painful, man gathers materials and builds them into mental and moral faculties. The aim of a Sadhaka is to fry out or burn or obliterate all these Samskaras through Nirbija Samadhi. Sadhana consists in wiping out the Samskaras. Jnani is without Samskaras. They are fried out by Jnana. No doubt, the force of the Samskaras remains in the Antahkarana. But they are harmless. They will not bind the Jnani.

    ༺ ॐ ༻