॥२॥ साधनपाद - 2. Sādhana Pāda - Practice



results: 1 - 10 of 55 from chapter 2

  • 2.1 : तपःस्वाध्यायेश्वरप्रणिधानानि क्रियायोगः॥१॥
  • 1. Tapaḥ svādhyāyeśvarapraṇidhānāni kriyā yogaḥ.
  • The practice of yoga is the 'yoga of action', kriyayoga', comprising tapas, self-discipline, svadhyaya, self-study and Isvara pranidhana, surrender to God.
  • Tapas is the blinding desire to burn away the impurities of body, senses and mind. Svadhyaya is the reiteration of sacred mantras and the study of spiritual sacred texts, in order to comprehend one's own self. Isvara prani-dhana is surrendering of one's body, mind and soul to God through love for Him. The disciplines of cleansing man's three constituents - body, speech and mind constitute kriyayoga - the path to perfection. Human bodies are purified by self-discipline (tapas), words by Self-study (svadhyaya) and minds by love and surrendering to Him (Isvara pranidhana). This sutra symbolises the three great paths - karma, jnana and bhaka. The path of action (karma-marga) is the discipline (tapas) of body, senses and mind. The path of knowledge (jnana-marga) is the study of the self (svadhyaya) from the skin to the core and back again. The path of love of God (bhakti-marga) is surrendering (pranidhana) of everything to God. Sadhana pada distinguishes the source of all these paths. The first symbolises life, the second wisdom. The third, through the surrender of ego, brings the humbleness that leads to the effulgent, sorrowless light of Isvara, God.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.2 : समाधिभावनार्थः क्लेशतनूकरणार्थश्च॥२॥
  • 2. Samādhi bhāvanārthaḥ kleśa tanūkaraṇārthaś ca.
  • This discipline is practised for the purpose of acquiring fixity of mind on the Lord, free from all impurities and agitations, or on One's Own Reality, and for attenuating the afflictions.
  • Most of us make our minds like spoiled children, allowing them to do whatever they want. Therefore it is necessary that there should be constant practice of the previous mortifications, in order to gain control of the mind, and bring it into subjection. The obstructions to Yoga arise from lack of this control, and cause us pain. They can only be removed by denying the mind, and holding it in check, through these various means. Deep peace is the side effects of this experience of “no-thing” or “no-thought.”  It is the realization that you are more than your thoughts.  Something is there beyond your mind.  Negative thoughts  create negative feelings and hence stress and illness.  Our inner voice evaluates, judges, compares and worries.   Most people live with such a tormentor in their head draining them of energy. It is an awful burden not to be able to stop thinking.  Up to 90 % of most people’s thoughts are meaningless playbacks of old broken “records”. Silencing the body is easy, but silencing the mind is difficult in this modern age.  Silencing is about grace, harmony and tranquility. Exhaustion or being drugged out of your mind is NOT tranquility. In the modern age people get stressed, and they need to still the mind--the chattering monkey, which remains entangled in the past and the imagined future, but never in the present.  A person stops thinking either when he is dead or when he has realised.  When your ego powered mind is chattering like a monkey or the angry sea, you miss the truth.  Truth can be communicated only in silence. For this deep silence you need to have harmony between the mind, body and spirit.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.3 : अविद्यास्मितारागद्वेषाभिनिवेशाः क्लेशाः॥३॥
  • 3. Avidyāsmitā rāga dveṣābhiniveśāḥ kleśāḥ.
  • The five afflictions which disturb the equilibrium of consciousness are - ignorance or lack of wisdom, ego, pride of the ego or the sense of 'I', attach ment to pleasure, aversion to pain, fear of death and clinging to life.
  • Ignorance is the field or source for the four Klesas, viz., Asmita, Raga, Dvesha and Abhinivesa. All these five disorders ruffle the mind like physical malady. Therefore they are great impediments to meditation. They raise Vrittis and bring about fructification of Karmas by coming to depend upon one another for mutual support. If you eradicate Abhinivesa, Raga and Dvesha currents will die. If you remove egoism, these two currents, like and dislike will vanish. The root for egoism, Raga, Dvesha and Abhinivesa is ignorance. If ignorance is destroyed by getting knowledge of Purusha through Samadhi, the other four Klesas will die by themselves. The Karmas are supported by afflictions and the afflictions are supported by Karmas. This is mutual support. This is a Chakrika or cycle like the analogy of the seed and the tree (Bija-Vriksha Nyaya). These Klesas develop the Mahat Tattva, egoism and Tanmatras. These are the five ties that bind a man to the wheel of birth and death – the impediment to moksha. The most important knot is ignorance (Hridaya Granthi). This is the fundamental cause. The other four Klesas are the effects of ignorance. Pain and sin are ignorance only. These manifest in those who have forgotten the true all-blissful and eternally pure nature of Purusha. Afflictions are of three levels - intellectual, emotional and intuitive. Avidya and asmita belong to the arena of intelligence; here lack of spiritual knowledge combined with pride or arrogance billows the ego, inducing arrogance and the loss of one's sense of balance. Raga and dvesa belong to emotions and feelings. Raga is desire and attachment, dvesa is hatred and aversion. Succumbing to exuberant desires and attachments or allowing oneself to be carried away by expressions of hatred, creates dissonance between body and mind, which may lead to psychosomatic disorders. Abhinivesa is intuitive - the desire to prolong one's life, and concern for one's own survival. Cohering to life makes one apprehensive in dealings with others, and causes one to become selfish and self-centred. The root causes of these five afflictions are the behavioural functions and thoughts of the various spheres of brain. Avidya and asmita are connected with the conscious frontal brain, and the top brain is considered the seat of the 'T' consciousness. Raga and dvesa are connected with the base of the brain, the hypothalamus. Abhinivesa is connected with the 'old' brain or back brain which is also known as the unconscious brain, because it retains past subliminal impressions, samskaras. The sadhaka must learn to locate the sources of afflictions, in order to be able to clip them in the bud through his yogic principles and disciplines. Discrimination remains shaky as long as false knowledge has not been completely removed. Egoism is the root cause for Raga (attachment to pleasures ). Asmita happens when you identify with the parts of yourself that change—everything from your mind to your body, appearance, or job title—instead of with the quiet place within you that does not change.   Road rage has to do with reptilian instincts ,the amygdala is involved. The amygdala can mistakenly misfire messages of danger creating a chronic state of anxiety and panic. The amygdalae react to negative events in many ways, including activation of your sympathetic nervous system. The results cause you gut wrenching turmoil. Because the amygdala helped the ancient cave man survive, it remained as the brain grew and evolved. Today, it’s rare that we face an extreme emergency that requires the amygdale to spring into action, but it does so nevertheless.  It is the classic “fight or flight response.” A feeling of revenge and retribution , “to teach a lesson”  to a guy who has “cut you off “ is always involved in road rage .  Some delusional ones even feel that they have been chosen to “bell this bad cat”. Road-rage incidents stem from the stimulation of the reptilian mind -- a driver experiencing road rage feels threatened and responds aggressively to ensure his “survival”.   The reptilian brain is inflexible, compulsive, ritualistic and incapable of learning from previous screw-ups. Territoriality - like many animals, human beings react negatively when we feel our space is threatened by someone else. A mature man does not engage in self-destructive behavior. Maturity is the ability to bear an injustice without wanting to get evenand act within the framework of dignity.   When you are consumed by rage you hyperventilate , there is an increase in your heart rate, BP and a rush of adrenaline, cortisol and other stress-induced hormones. Breathing deeply from your diaphragm is essential to calming and relaxing you. There is nothing mystical about the power that breathing has to prevent panic. As you control the rate of your breathing, it sends a subconscious message to the amygdala that there is no need to be stressed.  Just breathe deep and slow until you feel any butterflies start to settle down. Yoga has NOTHING to do with hyperventilation (  patented  SO HUM  ) taught by Sri Sri Ravishankar. There are many low IQ drivers on the road—remember this.  He is NOT busting your balls.  He is just trying to reach his destinations using his limited cerebral faculty. You do NOT get angry with stationary trees which have  popped up on your path, right? Rage is a complete blackout of the thoughts.  Rage only sees its own "rightness".  Rage does not care if it hurts others, in fact it aches to hurt somebody.  Rage feels justified in hurting others. Rage detracts from the quality of your life, driving away the people who love you and can help you. According to yoga philosophy, this unchanging part of you is known as the “seer”—the cit, drasta (drg), or purusa—that which experiences or “sees” the world through the lens of the mind. As Patanjali explains in the Yoga Sutra, the mind—which includes your thoughts, emotions, and even the sensory input you receive from your body—is the instrument of perception through which the seer engages with the world around you. Asmita, or false identification, is common to everyone because our external qualities inevitably influence how we see ourselves. The nature of the Soul is eternal bliss. What can make it sorrowful except ignorance, hallucination, delusion;  all this pain of the soul is simply delusion.  For destroying the following evil Vrittis, raise the opposite good Vrittis given against each: - Lust (Kama).. Brahmacharya, Mumukshutva.---Anger (Krodha)...Love, Kshama (forgiveness), Daya (Mercy), Maitri (friendship), Santi, Dhriti (patience), Ahimsa.---Pride (Mada)... Humility (Namrata or Vinaya).---Greed (Lobha)...Honesty, disinterestedness, generosity, Santosha (contentment), Aparigraha (non-covetousness).---Jealousy (Irshya)...Nobility (Udarata), magnanimity, Mudita (complacency).---Delusion (Moha)...Viveka (discrimination).---Vanity, Hypocrisy (Dambha)...Simplicity.---Darpa (arrogance)... Politeness, Hri (Modesty).---Cunningness... Arjava (crookedness) (straightforwardness).---Harshness... Mildness.---Attachment (Raga)...Vairagya.---Insincerity (Asraddha)...Sraddha (faith).---Chanchalatvam (Fickleness)... Determination (Nischaya Vritti).

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.4 : अविद्याक्षेत्रमुत्तरेषां प्रसुप्ततनुविच्छिन्नोदाराणाम्॥४॥
  • 4. Avidyā kṣetram uttareṣām prasupta tanu vicchinnodārāṇām.
  • Lack of true knowledge is the source of all pains and sorrows - whether dormant, attenuated, interrupted or fully active.
  • Patanjali explains avidya as the fostering-ground of all affliction, whatever its nature. To fully dismantle avidya is the deep goal of yoga, and it demands a radical shift of consciousness. In the Bhagavad Gita it is noted that all sufferings and limitations imposed by the ego come from avidya; consequently man has to seek knowledge, with which hatred, injury and greed are incompatible. Avidya is not lack of information,  but a "more deep seated misperception of reality". Avidya means more than ignorance—it is lack of wisdom The term includes not only ignorance out of darkness, but also obscuration, misconceptions, mistaking illusion to be reality or impermanent to be permanent or suffering to be bliss or non-self to be self (delusions).    Avidya includes confusing the mundane reality to be the only reality, and it as a permanent though it is ever changing.   Avidya is a deep habit of consciousness, but it’s a habit that we can shift—with intention, practice, and a lot of help from the universe.  Avidya - spiritual ignorance, is the source of all the other obstacles - arrogance, desire , aversion etc.. These afflictions, whether dormant, weakened or alternating between hidden and fully active, are obstacles to self-enlightenment. Ignorance causes Vipareetha Bhavana (perverted understanding), and the man is rendered blind by passion and various sorts of Raga. He is under intoxication. Ignorance clouds understanding. An ignorant man is a dead man while living.   He is a living buried soul, despite his wealth, possession and university knowledge. To take a thing for what is not, is ignorance. It is not a privation of knowledge. It is a Bhava Vastu. It does not mean absence of knowledge. You mistake this perishable body of five elements and various impurities as the pure Self. You think that you are the body only and you have forgotten the real nature of Purusha. This is delusion. The effect of avidya is to suppress the real nature of things and present something else in its place. In effect it is not different from Maya  or illusion. Avidya relates to the individual Self (atman), while Maya is an adjunct of the cosmic Self (Brahman).    Adi Shankaracharya says in his Introduction to his commentary on the Brahma Sutras, "Owing to an absence of discrimination, there continues a natural human behaviour in the form of 'I am this' or 'This is mine'; this is avidya. It is a superimposition of the attributes of one thing on another. The ascertainment of the nature of the real entity by separating the superimposed thing from it is vidya (knowledge, illumination)". In Shankara's philosophy avidya cannot be categorized either as 'absolutely existent' or as 'absolutely non-existent'. Avidya is a fundamental blindness about reality. The core ignorance we call avidya isn’t a lack of information, but the inability to experience your deep connection to others, to the source of being, and to your true Self. Avidya in action is in the habit of thinking that you need someone’s approval to feel good about yourself.   Patanjali’s sutra on avidya is not just a description of the problem of ignorance. It’s also the key to the solution. When you pull back and question the things you think are eternal and permanent, you begin to recognize the wondrous flux that is your life. When you ask, “What’s the real source of happiness?” you extend your focus beyond the external trigger to the feeling of happiness itself. And when you seek to know the difference between the false self and the true one, that’s when the veil might come off altogether and show you that you’re not just who you take yourself to be, but something much brighter, much vaster, and much more free. Avidya is to mistake the impermanent for the eternal, the impure for the pure, sorrow for happiness, and the not-Self for the true Self. Just as the mirror is rendered dim by a layer of dirt attaching to it, so also Knowledge is veiled by Avidya. Dismantling avidya is a multilayered process, which is why one breakthrough is usually not enough. Since different types of practice unpick different aspects of avidya, there are different types of yoga for each one—devotional practice for the ignorance of the heart, selfless action for the tendency to attach to outcomes, meditation for a wandering mind. The good news is that any level you choose to work with is going to make a difference. On a day-to-day, moment-to-moment level, you burn off a few layers of avidya every time you turn your awareness inward and reflect on the subtle meaning of a feeling or a physical reaction. Avidya, in all its subtle forms, works within us constantly to root us in our habitual ways and make improvement difficult or impossible. The more we indulge Avidya, the stronger it becomes. Eventually, we feel that we are no longer the doer of these things; they simply happen to us. For most of us, Avidya will remain to some extent throughout our lives. However, the more we can live from the true spirit within, the Purusa, the more authentically we live our lives. We relate to others better, make better decisions, and the hold of ignorance upon our lives gradually diminishes. We become the best person we can possibly be and thereby benefit the world.  Avidya  is the antithesis of Vidya, or true knowledge.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.5 : अनित्याशुचिदुःखानात्मसु नित्यशुचिसुखात्मख्यातिरविद्या॥५॥
  • 5. Anityāśuci duḥkhānātmasu nitya śuci sukhātmakhyātir avidyā.
  • Ignorance is taking the non-eternal for the eternal, the impure for the pure, evil for good and non-self as self.
  • Vidya is not mere intellectual knowledge, for the Vedas demand understanding. Its root is Vid which means - to reason upon, knower, finding, knowing, acquiring or understanding. In Hindu philosophy, Vidya refers to the knowledge of the soul or spiritual knowledge. It is NOT mundane “Capital of Iran is Teheran “ –type knowledge . It is but ordinary that one will make mistakes. But when, through want of understanding, one fails to reappraise or reflect, error turns a habit. As the processes of thought and action have existed from the beginning of civilization, so has trial and error been used in the quest for knowledge. But when all doubts have been settled in the pursuit of sadhana, the discriminative power of intelligence comes to an end and pure wisdom alone resides, where perception and action are concurrent. Experimental and experiential knowledge correspond. Objective knowledge and subjective knowledge become one. This is pure vidya- the highest knowledge. All these various sorts of impression have one source: ignorance.   We have first to learn what ignorance is. All of us think that “I am the body,” and not the Self, the pure, the effulgent, the ever blissful, and that is ignorance. We think ofman, and see man as body. This is the great delusion. The word, Vidya, in the Brahmana portions of the Yajurveda and in the Upanishads. In Hinduism, , leaving aside Vishnu avatars , gods  are cosmic forces , personifications of the deepest level of power and energy. The concept of Shakti, in its most abstract terms, relates to the energetic principle of Ultimate Reality, the dynamic aspect of the divine. This concept surfaces in the Kena Upanishad as Goddess Umā bestowing Brahma-vidya on Indra; when linked with shakti and maya, she embodies the power of illusion (maya), encompassing ignorance (avidya) and knowledge (vidyā) and thereby presented with a dual personality. The Upanishads teach us that the knowledge of difference is avidyā or ignorance, and the knowledge of identity is true knowledge or vidyā or valid knowledge, which leads to life eternal. Sankara accepted perception, inference, scriptural testimony, comparison, presumption and non-apprehension as the six sources of knowledge and concluded that the knowledge which corresponds with the real nature of its object is valid. The Atman is the reality in the empirical self as the ever present foundational subject-objectless universal consciousness which sustains the empirical self. All forms of contemplation have only one aim: to lead to the Supreme Knowledge and hence they are termed as vidyas; through vidya, which is amrta, one attains immortality (Shvetashvatara Upanishad Verse V.1). In ancient India , we had gurukuls where students stayed with the Guru ( mentor ) .  The students were clay,  to be moulded by the Guru. The ancient Indian Guru as a mentor retains a magic control over the pupil even after he walks out of the ashram after his studies.  The usual modern teacher  treats the mind as a vessel to be filled up, while the Guru ignited the mind in peaceful environments , next to a water body or a waterfall supercharges with negative ions . If the environment is not OK , the dialogue between minds cannot happen.   The Guru does NOT bid the shishya to enter the glorious house of his own wisdom  -- rather he leads him gently into the threshold of his own mind.  The Guru is a prober and never an interrogator. He does NOT play the power game .  Nididhyasana happens in a gurukul--  the practice of atma-vichara, self-enquiry, self-investigation, self-scrutiny or self-attentiveness.  

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.6 : दृग्दर्शनशक्त्योरेकात्मतेवास्मिता॥६॥
  • 6. Dṛg darśana śaktyor ekātmatevāsmitā.
  • Egoism is the identification of the seer with the instrumental power of seeing.
  • One of the five Kleshas or hindrances in Yogic philosophy is Asmita, or egoism. The word Klesha is derived from the sanskrit root Klish which means “to suffer, torment or distress- to cause trouble”. The Kleshas are the Hindrances. They are the five factors that lead us into suffering. (Avidya-Non-seeing,  Asmita-Egoism,  Raga- Attachment,  Dvesha- Aversion, Abhinivesa- Fear of Death).  Asmita is the “I” maker.  We need our ego to organize our mind and navigate through life, but to over identify with and cling to these labels ultimately brings suffering.   Even though we may know intellectually that our sense organs are simply acting as instruments for the ‘self’ , we still say ‘I see’ or ‘I hear’ etc giving the false indication that seeing and hearing are done by the self. Asmita differs from our traditional conception of egoism in a few important ways.  When we think of ego, we generally think of conceit or holding a high opinion of oneself, but this is only a small part in the Yogic view.   Patanjali defines egoism as mistaking the transient aspects of ourselves – the physical, emotional, and mental – for the true self, which according to the Yogis is the unchanging, ever-peaceful observer behind those characteristics. Distinguishing the instruments of cognition - the senses of perception, intelligence and ego or the sense of the individual self - with the pure seer is egoism, or the conception of individuality. When we start to think of ourselves in terms of the incomplete view provided by limited aspects of our being, we begin a process of alienation from both ourselves and the world.  This alienation becomes more striking when we realize those partial elements are also transient. Though the body and the eternal Self are dissimilar entities, lack of knowledge makes one believe that they are one. Taking pride in the body as the Self is also avidya. Though there is a dissimilarity between the seer (atma) and the seen, during the act of perceiving the seen (the mind itself) looks as if the pure seer. This appearance of merging or 'oneness' is because of asmita. One must be aware of the difference between the seer (atma) and the instrument that sees (buddhi). If they coalesce and work together, that experience is reality. But if the mind and senses - the seer's agents, take it upon themselves to identify with the true seer, as though the seer were manifest or apparent, then polarities are created and seer and seen become separated or split. Asmita is the identification of consciousness with the vehicle through which the power of cognition is being expressed. Asmita literally means I-am-ness or awareness of Self-existence. When, however, it identifies with one of its vehicles, it is no more pure and is bound by the limitations of Avidya. The identification of consciousness with matter proceeds progressively from subtle to grosser elements. In that process, the veil of avidya gets thicker.  Thoughts, opinions, prejudices etc are much harder to deal with from the point of view of ‘asmita’. Ego is to consider the nature of the seer and the nature of the instrumental power of seeing to be the same thing. Asmita, is the misidentification of buddhi, the instrumental power of ‘darshana’, with the soul (purusha). Asmita, in this sense, is also known as ‘ego’ that is responsible for imagining the body and mind, which are mere instruments, to be the self.  Ego is at the root of all suffering.   Ego drags us into the past or the future as it doesn’t feel comfortable in the present moment. We can only feel peaceful and stress-free when we are in the present moment. The moment we step into the past or the future and try to dwell there, stress and unhappiness creeps in.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.7 : सुखानुशयी रागः॥७॥
  • 7. Sukhānuśayī rāgaḥ.
  • Attachment is that magnetic pattern which clusters in pleasure and pulls one towards such experience.
  • Raga is attachment /affinity for something, implying a desire for that.   This can be emotional (instinctual) or intellectual. It may range from simple liking or preference to intense desire and attraction.  Raga is the attraction towards any person or object. Affinity for booze or drugs is a raga. Attraction in this manner happens because the soul in bondage, having lost its inner source of bliss (ananda), gropes for happiness in the external world.   Any object that provides such an experience becomes dear to it. Raga is  that modification which follows remembrance of pleasure.  An experience of pleasure results in a latent impression which subsequently can lead to desire or craving for the same experience. In attachment, desire and senses are drawn involuntarily towards objects. When desire deepens into greed, the sense of right and wrong becomes neglected. By this the self gets linked up with the senses. The detached self, in this case, appears to be bound with the latent impressions of pleasure.  Raga is craving for pleasure by one who remembers past experience of pleasure. Ego is the root of attachment just as ignorance is the root of ego. Ignorance and ego cause the deluded mind to associate the self with the latent impressions of past experience of pleasure. Residing on pleasurable experiences inflames desire and a sense of attraction, which induces attachment. Pleasurable experiences spawns greed and lust, which strengthen attachment and provokes a greater passion, as one always wants more and more. One becomes absorbed by the pursuit of pleasure, and addicted to satiation of the senses. The aspirer may thus forget his chosen path and allow himself to be caught up in sorrow and sickness.  When Consciousness appears to be an individual, which happens after the veils of avidya and asmita are added, it can look at the rest of the apparent manifestation and start to like parts of it. When a sensory impression comes into the mind and ahamkara colors it with like, with attraction, it means the another veil is added, namely that of raga. This adds another false identity to “me”, because it is the appearance of “I” who likes, so anything colored with raga is immediately related to me.   These are the things we want to do, keep, have, feel, experience.  In modern terms, it’s much like the pleasure principle – there’s a strong attraction to what brings instant pleasure and gratification. Sometimes, we want these pleasurable things so much that we cling to them when we have them.  Raga causes us to endlessly chase after our desires.   Raga keeps us unsatisfied even when what we want is in our lap, either by trying to retain it or by the impulse to want more.  We cling like a barnacle to the things that we’re comfortable with and make us feel good when Raga asserts itself.  Raga can cause restlessness, despair, and havoc in the mind. Raga and Dvesha are two sides of the same coin

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.8 : दुःखानुशयी द्वेषः॥८॥
  • 8. Duḥkhānuśayī dveṣaḥ.
  • That repulsion which accompanies pain is Dvesa
  • Pain, sorrow and misery spark off a chain of hate or loathing. Recalling lost pleasures, excruciated by desires unfulfilled, man is driven towards sorrow. In utmost anguish he comes to hate himself, his family, neighbours and surroundings, and feels a sense of worthlessness. A discriminating person endeavours to acquire knowledge, so that he may strike a balance between sukha and duhkha and live at the mercy of neither pleasure nor pain. We run away from conceived pain. . When the Ragas and Dveshas rear their heads, try to see them for what they are – colors that you are painting over external things.  Dvesha is repulsion felt towards a person or object which is a source of unhappiness. Raga and dvesha go together – they are like the opposite sides of the same coin.  Raga and dvesha which bind us to external objects condition our life in such a way that we begin to think, feel and act according to these biases. Raga and dvesha bind us down to the lower levels of consciousness where consciousness functions under the greatest limitations. Dvesha binds us the same way as raga. We are tied to the person we hate even more than the person we love since it is more difficult to transmute the force of hatred.  Every morning detractors of my blogsite dwell on each word I write and corrode in their own juices. Some minds hang on you through Raga, while some others hang on you through Dvesha.  Vairagya is not just freedom from raga but equally from dvesha. Raga and dvesha belong to the vehicles (elements of prakriti) but owing to avidya we associate us with them. These are responsible for much of human misery. Aversion is the feeling of opposition, propensity to hurt and anger towards misery or object producing misery, arising from recollection of misery experienced before. As in Raga, the latencies of misery are falsely attributed to the self and the inactive self is regarded as the doer.  In the Bhagavad Gita there is a often-quoted passage (shlokas 2.62-63), sometimes referred to as "the ladder of destruction" . --"Repeated focus on an object results in affection ‘sanga’. From affection results strong desire ‘kama’.  If you are not able to satisfy the desire or kama you will end up with anger ‘krodha’. Increased anger results in increased ego and focus on the inner self ‘sammoha’. When this happens, past experience ‘smriti’ is forgotten and a person loses judgement ‘smriti vibramaha’. Lack of judgement results in destruction of wisdom ‘buddhi nashaha’ and finally the person is lost ‘pranashyati’." But, moving amidst (unavoidable) sense objects with sense organs which are under control and which are free from likes (raga) and dislikes (dvesha), a man of self-control enjoys tranquility.However, it becomes a ‘raga’ (attachment) only when that desire becomes a craving (addiction  like porn ) and results in suffering if not fulfilled.  If we can develop an attitude of indifference to the outcome of a desire, then having a desire is not bad. Raga (attraction), Dvesha (repulsion) and Tatastha Vritti (indifference) are the three important Vrittis of the mind. Raga and Dvesha (like and dislike or love and hatred or attraction and repulsion) are the two currents in the mind which bind a man to the Samsaric wheel of birth and death. Raga and Dvesha are the two Doshas or faults in the mind that have brought you to this world. The Svarupa of Bandha (bondage) is Raga and Dvesha. The Svarupa of Ajnana is Raga and Dvesha. All the emotions come under the category of Raga-Dvesha. These two currents are the Dharma (characteristics) of the mind and not of the spirit. Pleasure and pain, Harsha and Soka, exhilaration and depression are due to Raga-Dvesha. If Raga and Dvesha vanish from the mind, Harsha-Soka also will disappear. Fear is hidden in Raga. When you have got Raga for body, fear of death comes in. When you have Raga for money, there is fear of losing money, as money is the means of getting objects of enjoyment. When you have Raga for a beautiful woman, you become obsessed in protecting her. Fear is a very old, intimate friend of Raga. Raga-Dvesha has four Avasthas, viz., Dagdha (burnt up), Tanu (attenuated or thinned out), Vicchinna (concealed) and Udara (fully expanded). The first two states pertain to a Yogin; the last two to worldlings. In a fully developed Yogin, the Vrittis of Raga-Dvesha are burnt up by Nirvikalpa Samadhi. They are Dagdha (like burnt-up seeds). When the mind is set in motion or vibration through the currents of Raga-Dvesha, real Karmas begin. Real Karma originates from Sankalpas of the mind. It is the actions of the mind that are truly termed Karmas. External actions manifest later on. It is desire that sets the mind in motion. When there is a desire, Raga and Dvesha exist side by side in the mind. Desire is a motive force. Emotions and impulses co-exist with desire. That Yogin or Jnanin who has destroyed these two Vrittis of Raga and Dvesha is the highest man in the three worlds. He is the real King of kings, Emperor of emperors. Even if a Jnanin or Yogin sometimes exhibits traces of anger, it is Abhasamatra (mere appearance). Just as the impression made in water with a stick passes away soon, as also the anger will disappear in the twinkling of an eye, even though it manifests in a Jnanin. This can hardly be understood by worldly people. He who has no Raga but possesses Titiksha (power of endurance) can do anything. He can move about wherever he likes.. His happiness, freedom and peace are unbounded. Their extent can hardly be imagined. The freedom and joy of such Sannyasins cannot be imagined by the poor, petty-minded worldlings. It is Raga and luxury that have enfeebled the householders who must keep up with the Joneses and must get an invite for a page 3 party. Destroy the true modifications of the mind, Raga-Dvesha, by Vichara and Brahma-Chintana (right thinking and meditation). Go beyond the Dvandvas (pairs of opposites). You will get eternal, infinite bliss and peace. Amongst the several Vrittis in the mind, FAALTHU  Raga-Dvesha and Moha are very deep-rooted. They demand strenuous and persistent efforts for their eradication.  Remember the opposing forces which forces you into bad karma.

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  • 2.9 : स्वरसवाही विदुषोऽपि तथारूढो भिनिवेशः॥९॥
  • 9. Svarasavāhī viduṣo’pi tathā rūḍho’bhiniveśaḥ.
  • Self-preservation or attachment to life is the subtlest of all afflictions. It is found even in wise men.
  • Abhinivesha is a layer of fear that is added on top of an attraction (raga) or an aversion (dvesha).Patanjali indicates that every human being has had a taste of death, which lurks. This impress is the seed of fear. Abhinivesa is an intuitive defect which can be transformed into intuitive knowledge and insight by practising yoga. While practising asana, pranayama or dhyana, the sadhaka penetrates deep within himself. He experiences unity in the flow of intelligence, and the current of self-energy. In this state, he perceives that there is no difference between life and death, that they are simply two sides of the same coin. He understands that the current of self, the life-force, active while he is alive, unites with the universe when it leaves his body at death. Through this understanding, he loses his fixation for life and conquers the fear of death. This liberates him from afflictions and sorrows and leads him towards kaivalya. If avidya is the root cause of afflictions, so abhinivesa results in pain. In realising the oneness of life and death there is an end to ignorance in the aspirer, and he lives forever in the flow of tranquillity.A person becomes wise only when all the five kleshas have been completely eradicated. The second point in the sutra is that this desire for life is ‘swarasavahi’ which means it is sustained by its own inherent force. Abhinivesha is merely the final manifestation of all the kleshas.  Raga (attractions) and dvesha (repulsions) are the immediate cause of abhinivesha. Thus, stronger are the likes and dislikes, more prominently noticeable will be the desire for life or fear of death.Abhinivesha is a result of the past memory of death.  Even animals fear death.   Since death happened in a past life, this sutra establishes previous lives.If it be true that all our knowledge has come from experience, then it is sure that that which we never experienced we cannot imagine, or understand. Even a new-born animal  is afraid of death. This can only be explained by a latent impression (samskara) of a previous experience of death. The word abhinivesha is a compound word derived from the root word ‘vish’ (to enter), preceded by the two prefixes ‘abhi’ and ‘ni’. The literal meaning of the word is ‘strong desire to hold on to something’.   In the context of this sutra it represents a strong desire to cling to life with the extended meaning of ‘fear of death’.  Essentially the word may mean any kind of fear. This klesha is a result of the previous two kleshas – raga (attraction) and dvesha (repulsion). Raga leads to the fear of losing something that we desire to hold on to, or the fear of not being able to get what we strongly desire. Dvesha leads to the fear of getting something that we truly dislike (disease, for example), or the fear of not being able to get rid of something that we dislike (again disease, for example). The ultimate fear, of course, is the fear of death. To control our passions we have to control them at their very roots; then alone shall we be able to burn out their very seed. As fried seeds thrown into the ground will never come up, so these passions will never arise.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 2.10 : ते प्रतिप्रसवहेयाः सूक्ष्माः॥१०॥
  • 10. Te pratiprasavaheyāḥ sūkṣmāḥ.
  • Subtle afflictions are to be minimised and eradicated by a process of involution
  • Afflictions may be gross or subtle; both must be neutralised and eliminated, quietened at their very roots. The Upanishads mention past-life regression.   Patañjali discussed the idea of the soul becoming burdened with an accumulation of impressions as part of the karma from previous lives.  Patañjali called the process of past-life regression prati-prasav (literally "reverse birthing"), and saw it as addressing current problems through memories of past lives.   Some types of yoga continue to use prati-prasav as a practice the "memories" recovered by techniques like past-life regression are the result of cryptomnesia: narratives created by the subconscious mind using imagination, forgotten information and suggestions from the therapist. Memories created under hypnosis are indistinguishable from actual memories and can be more vivid than factual memories. The five adversities - ignorance, egoism, lust, malice and attachment to life appear gross (sthula) on the surface, but their subtle nature may be either latent or highly lively, or may alternate between the two . Meditation helps to exterminate them. The subtle afflictions start with attachment to life, travel in the reverse order, contrary to spiritual evolution and end with the gross affliction, ignorance. Subtle afflictions need to be overcome before they lead to trouble.  If a seed becomes seared, it cannot sprout; so one must render an affliction infertile by tracing it back to its source. The mother of subtle afflictions is the mind, whose movements should be directed towards the seer by the yogic process of involution (prati prasava). In this manner, subtle afflictions are crushed and an un-polarised state of pure knowledge is chanced upon. These, the subtle ones, can be reduced by resolving them backward into their origin.The kleshas can exist in one of two states, active and potential. A person in a fit of anger is expressing the klesha of dvesha in an active state. Through the practice of yoga a person may acquire the ability to remain calm in difficult situations. Even at that time the kleshas remain in a dormant or potential state where, given the right trigger, the kleshas can again become active. Essentially there are three stages of dealing with the kleshas – attenuation (tanukarana), converting to inactive (prasupta) state, and finally burnt seeds. Pratiprasava literally means to go back to the original cause.   In the case of kleshas, avidya (ignorance) is the root cause of the subsequent kleshas. To eliminate the lowest level of klesha, abhinivesha (fear of death), we need to go to the cause which are raga (likes) and dvesha (dislikes). From there we need to trace the cause back to ego and then back to avidya. In order to uproot kleshas altogether we need to eliminate avidya and reach the state of kaivalya. As long as the seed remains, even though it may be in a potential (sushupta) state, it can still fructify given favorable triggers. To destroy the seeds completely, one needs to go through the various stages of samadhi and attain the state of "kaivalya". The word "pratiprasava",  which is the opposite of "prasava", means resolving into the cause.  These kleshas are subtle; they are destroyed when (the mind) dissolves back into its original matrix. When the mind has fulfilled its purpose of attaining "nirbija samadhi", then it dissolves back into prakriti. The mind at this point becomes redundant. The kleshas too dissolve along with the mind. Like burnt seeds, kleshas do not disappear as long as the mind is still active.Three stages of dealing with the kleshas:Attenuation (tanu-karana), Burning the seeds (dagdha bija),--by Prati Prasava we can  accessing the deep hidden negative memories of the past this and previous lifetimes.  These memories remain hidden deep in the subconscious mind though ‘forgotten’ by the conscious mind that are the root causes of our negative reactions, habits, and actions that cause more karmic, thus falling into the endless loop of cause and effect. In Prati Prasav sadhna all these deep-rooted emotions and psychic impressions are accessed and surfaced to be released and healed. Our present is nothing but the reflection of what we did in the past due to soul samkaras picked up in past lives. This explains phobias.  The purpose of our birth is to resolve the issues that remained unresolved from our past lives. The circumstances and the problems one is facing is due the stored baggage of psychic impressions that one has collected in various lives with every action, word and thought. The psychic impressions are not just from past lives but also received and absorbed even in the infant and fetus stage in the mother’s womb. Obstacles in life indicates unresolved issues and more the obstacles and issues in life, the more are the unresolved issues, which need to be resolved so that one does not get stuck in similar circumstances again and again repeatedly, birth after birth. This unresolved issue is what is called as samskars or sanchit karmas or psychic impressions. In order to release the suffering, pain or disease of present life or to attain the higher level of spirituality and experience the ultimate truth one has to release the sanchit karma or samskaras or psychic impressions. Prati Prasav Sadhna teaches how to shed this heavy load and bring out the inner light in the form of health happiness and prosperity. By releasing these impressions which are the reasons behind the cause of our present sufferings, one is able to weed out the root cause of sufferings and blockages in one’s life. By Prati Prasav Sadhna we can dissolve fears, phobias, sufferings, limitations and awakening of your consciousness towards infinite dimension. In order to release the suffering, pain or disease of present life or to attain the higher level of spirituality and experience the ultimate truth one has to release the sanchit karma or samskaras or psychic impressions.  Prati Prasav Sadhna teaches how to shed this heavy load and bring out the inner light in the form of health happiness and prosperity. Our cellular memory can store the memory of physical trauma like accidents, wounds, surgeries, abuse,trauma , fear etc that manifests in low self-esteem, stress etc. When trauma is suppressed into the cellular memory, that energy can get stuck.   Vaccines can be used to explain cellular memory. You are given a shot that contains a small controlled amount of a bacteria. Your immune system immediately sets up a counter-offensive to keep you from getting sick from it.  Then your immune system 'remembers' that type of experience to keep you healthy. This means vaccines evoke cell memory by their actions. Cells can “remember” how to fight a virus so you won’t get reinfected. All these modern psychiatrists talk about past life regression.  This means they are Hindus or they have stolen from our ancient texts. For only in Hinduism we have endless re-births till a person obtains Moksha , as a result of NIL Karmic baggage .  Past life regression a Vedic technique of Charaka is recommended for people who are willing and decided to change, to secure relief from vices, negativity, repetitive illnesses, phobias, separations and conflicts, inability to love,trust, learn. etc.  Upon completion of the past life regression therapy, subjects are able to “reverse and resolve” phobias, negativity and vices  which, they were unable to solve through any other modern treatment or therapy.  Each cell in our body stores memories from early life, intra-uterine life, our parents and ancestors as well as, many past generations.  A bio computer essentially acts like a file which when triggered causes us to act in a repetitive manner..  Erasing stored traumatic experiences from our cellular memory is akin to deleting a virus from a computer.    All Vedic healers were psychiatists . How many of modern psychiatrists are healers ?If each cell contains all of the information for the whole organism, then our experiences, good or bad, are also recorded on a cellular level.  Those experiences that we perceive as life threatening will continue to resonate within the memory banks of the body’s crystalline cellular and molecular matrix because we were not able to resolve the conflict or dissipate its energy. Every cell in our body has the ability to remember. Cells retain the information of all life experiences that has been absorbed from genetic heritage, nothing ever experienced whether positive or negative escapes being programmed...Without past life regression therapy it can be almost impossible to heal, as the memories are suppressed and we are not aware of holding onto them.The healer  helps the subject access the specific internal negative file and then reprograms or formats it.   If you magnify your cells down to your atoms, you would see that you are made up of subtle bundles of "info-energy."  Release stored emotions from your subconscious mind and cellular memory and find peace with your past, by past life regression.Cells are constantly growing and dying they are the ultimate reflection of how the universe works.  The universe is constantly changing, constantly transforming chaos to order, darkness into light and requires all who inhabit it.  So either we make the conscious decision to live and grow or do nothing, which is a personal choice. This is the meaning of old progamming of new cells—it is about cell memory. This is why is that if you have some skin disease ( our skin renews every 28 days )  , the new skin which comes does NOT cure the disease.  

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻