॥३॥ विभूतिपाद - 3. Vibhūti Pāda - Manifestation



results: 21 - 30 of 56 from chapter 3

  • 3.21 : कायरूपसंयमात् तद्ग्राह्यशक्तिस्तम्भे चक्षुःप्रकाशासंप्रयोगेऽन्तर्धानम्॥२१॥
  • 21. Kāyarūpa saṁyamāt tadgrāhya śakti staṁbhe cakṣuḥ prakāśāsaṁprayoge’ntardhānam.
  • By control over the subtle body, the yogi can suspend at will the rays of light radiating from himself, so that he becomes invisible to onlookers. He may again make himself visible by bringing back the power of perceptibility.
  • The lack of contact (samprayoga) between the light and vision has to do with the light coming from the yogi’s form and vision beam which emanates from the person who searches psychically or physically for him. Sometimes a yogi can sit right next to a person and that person cannot realize that the yogi is by his side. If one makes samyama on the form of one's body, obstructing its perceptibility and separating its power of manifestation from the eyes of the beholder, then one's body becomes invisible.  The yogi is not adding the quality of invisibility; rather he is withdrawing the quality of see-ability.. He does not really vanish, but he will not be seen by anyone.

    A chained Apollonius just disappeared into thin air , from the Roman Emperor Domitian’s crowded court--   never to be seen anymore.


    http://ajitvadakayil.blogspot.in/2016/04/apollonius-or-jesus-christ-who-is-real.html

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  • 3.22 : एतेन शब्दाद्यन्तर्धानमुक्तम् ॥२२॥
  • 22. Etena śabdādyantardhānam uktam.
  • In the similar manner as described above, he is able to detain sound, smell, taste, form and touch.
  • The results of actions may be immediate or delayed. Samyama on this can give one the ability to predict the course of future actions and even his own death.  In the same way as described in relation to sight (3.21), one is able to suspend the ability of the body to be heard, touched, tasted, or smelled.

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  • 3.23 : सोपक्रमं निरुपक्रमं च कर्म तत्संयमादपरान्तज्ञानमरिष्टेभ्यो वा॥२३॥
  • 23. Sopakramam nirupakramam ca karma tat saṁyamād aparānta jñānam ariṣṭebhyo vā.
  • The effects of action are immediate or delayed. By sarhyama on his actions, a yogi will gain fore-knowledge of their final fruits. He will know the exact time of his death by portents / signs ( arishta )
  • The fruits of action (karmaphala) are related to time (kala phala). If a piece of wet cloth is fully spread out, it dries quickly; if folded or rolled up, it takes a long time to dry. Likewise, the fruits of action may be felt immediately or at a later time. Sahcita karma, prarabdha karma and kriyamana karma, are three types of actions which bear fruit. The first is the merit or demerit compiled from former lives. The second refers specifically to the good or bad actions which have shaped one's present life. The third one generates by one's actions in this life. The effects of kriyamana karma are to come later - one can hence assume that Patanjali has included kriyamana karma and sancita karma in the category of nirupakrama, and prarabdha karma in sopakrama. Karmas are of two kinds: quickly manifesting and slowly manifesting. By samyama on them, or on the portents of death, the knowledge of the time of death is obtained.By samyama on his actions, a yogi will gain foreknowledge of their final fruits. Different qualities such as friendliness, compassion, and contentment can be inquired into through samyama. Thus, one can learn how to strengthen a chosen quality.

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  • 3.24 : मैत्र्यादिषु बलानि॥२४॥
  • 24. Maitryādiṣu balāni.
  • He gains moral and emotional strength by perfecting friendliness and other virtues towards one and all.
  • The yogi who perfects, compassion and benevolence, and who regards things impartially without getting involved, keeps his consciousness free from desire, rage, avarice, lust, pride and envy. With his mind purified of such weaknesses, affability evolves, which dispenses happiness to all. His equipoise of mind creates a graceful disposition of heart. By samyama on friendliness and other such qualities, the power to transmit them is obtained. When the yogi detaches himself from the cultural prejudices which were cultivated in this and in some past lives, he develops universal friendliness which is applied evenly without biases which come up from the subconscious memory as predispositions. However, being aware of those attitudes in his memory, he can know what sort of friendly or antagonistic relationship he had with others in past lives.The last three limbs combined together (Dharana, Dhyana & Samadhi) make up Samyama. Samyama is the state of resting in deep inner silence  (samadhi), along with the ability to pick up a thought (focus/dharana) and let it go inward (meditation/dhyana). Then the results of samyama come out from inner silence automatically, because inner silence/awareness is, in reality, a single field. Samyama is an advanced yogic technique, one that is based on principles which utilize the operative powers of some of the more subtle and universal facets of consciousness; facets which many of us are not aware even exist, but which are available to all of us, with a certain amount of practice. Samyama practice takes the stillness we cultivated in meditation and moves that stillness outward. Once the core samyama practice is mastered, it becomes a natural habit of letting go. In the stillness of pure awareness  intuition blooms.

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  • 3.25 : बलेषु हस्तिबलादीनि॥२५॥
  • 25. Baleṣu hasti balādīni
  • By sarhyama on strength, the yogi will develop the physical strength, grace, and endurance of an elephant.
  • This is a true incident. A small child  was run over by a truck. The truck stopped with the wheels on the child. The mother lifted the truck and someone took the child away, injured badly but alive. Scientists examined this incident that the woman gave to herself superhuman strength, and due to her astounding effort , her spine was crushed .


    A Yogi can train his mind to give the body strength , stamina or whatever .. Only today sports psychologists understand the wisdom of Patanjali.  Infinite energy is at the disposal of everyone if he only knows how to get it. The Yogi has discovered the science of getting it. Remember that we are talking about a very deep form of attention, not merely reflecting on, and trying to pretend to have that strength. A yogi develops certain mystic perfections during practice.  Westerners often wondered why Indian yogis could ignore pain . They wondered how Yogis  in the Himalayas could stand on one leg and sleep on a freezing windy night, nude.   It is not to show the foreign media. He is doing it for himself.  He has abilities honed by Yoga. By making Samyama on the strength of the elephant, etc., that strength comes to the Yogi.

    I was a successful captain at sea with ZERO failure record.   The secret was to make the team believe “ If we cant do it, under this captain’s leadership , who else can ?”

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  • 3.26 : प्रवृत्त्यालोकन्यासात् सूक्ष्मव्यवहितविप्रकृष्टज्ञानम्॥२६॥
  • 26. Pravṛttyāloka nyāsāt sūkṣma vyavahita viprakṛṣṭa jñānaṁ.
  • Concealed things, however near or far, are revealed to a yogi.
  • By consolidation of the inner light, i.e., the insight of the soul, a yogi develops super-sensitive powers of perception. Such insight brings the power of seeing things which are subtle and fine, concealed or at a distance. By making samyama on the Inner Light, one obtains knowledge of what is subtle, hidden, or far distant.  By directing the flash of inner light of higher sensory activity, knowledge of subtle objects, those hidden from view, and those very distant can be attained.  7000 years ago our Yoga texts wrote down about ESP ( Extrasensory perception), the sixth sense where  information  is NOT received  the recognized physical senses but sensed with the intuitive mind.   Unlike ordinary senses, ESP has virtually unlimited range, and it's experienced mainly as thoughts rather than bodily sensations.  ESP is independent of such factors as geography, time, intelligence, age, or education.   The conscious mind has subliminal psychic access to the collective unconscious, a vast repository of accumulative wisdom and experience of the human race. The natural tendency for ESP in individuals can be distorted by previous prejudices, thoughts, and conditioning. Yoga breaks this barrier.

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  • 3.27 : भुवनज्ञानं सूर्ये संयमात्॥२७॥
  • 27. Bhuvanajñānam sūrye saṁyamāt.
  • By sarhyama on the sun the yogi will have knowledge of the seven worlds, and of the seven cosmic centres in the body.
  • As the sun illuminates the world with its rays, likewise, the light of the soul reaches the sahasrara, the thousand-petalled cakra, also known as brahmakapala. The yogi knows the functions of both the outer and the inner worlds. As the microcosm symbolises the macrocosm, man's body epitomises the entire structure of the great universe. The inner sun is to be found only in meditation. It is accessible through the sushumna channel, the thin milky white stream of energy that courses through the center of the chakras. Through meditation on centers such as the heart (anahata chakra) or the space between the eyebrows (ajna chakra), the sun will eventually be revealed. To clear the clouded mind so as to be able to find this sun is one of the key reasons for all of the various practices of Yoga.

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  • 3.28 : चन्द्रे ताराव्यूहज्ञानम्॥२८॥
  • 28. Candre tārā vyūha jñānaṁ.
  • By samyama on the moon comes knowledge of the stars' alignment.
  • In the last sutra, the sun, surya, refers to the core of one's being. The moon, candra, refers to the mind and consciousness. The solar plexus is situated in the region of the trunk; the lunar plexus has its seat in the cerebrum. By samyama on that region, the yogi obtains further knowledge.  The brain is likened with the moon, which cools the solar system; the lunar plexus maintains a stable, constant temperature in the body, even though the seasonal temperature fluctuates. It also controls and directs the parasympathetic system and governs the functioning of the central nervous system. 

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  • 3.29 : ध्रुवे तद्गतिज्ञानम्॥२९॥
  • 29. Dhruve tadgati jñānaṁ.
  • By samyama on the Pole Star, the yogi knows the course of destiny.
  • By samyama on the Pole Star (dhruva naksatra), a yogi knows the movements of stars and their effect on the events of the world. Dhruva also represents the roof (ajna cakra) as well as the tip of the nose (nasagra). The yogi will know in advance about his own destiny, as well as that of others.


    http://ajitvadakayil.blogspot.in/2011/08/polaris-and-great-bear-capt-ajit.html

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  • 3.30 : नाभिचक्रे कायव्यूहज्ञानम्॥३०॥
  • 30. Nābhicakre kāyavyūha jñānam.
  • By samyama on the navel, the yogi acquires perfect knowledge of the disposition of the human body
  • By samyama on the navel area or nabhi cakra, also called manipuraka cakra, a yogi can obtain perfect knowledge of the constitution of the human body. He knows the activities of his each and every cell and thus becomes a master of his own body. The navel is known as kandasthana (kanda = egg or bulb; sthana = region). The root of all the nerves is in the navel. From the navel, 72,000  nadis branch out. Nadis are astral tubes made up of astral matter that carry Pranic currents. They can be seen by the astral eyes only. They are not nerves. They are 72,000 in number. Ida, Pingala and Sushumna are the important ones. Sushumna is the most important of all. There are two nerve-currents one on either side of the spinal column. The left one is called Ida and the right is known as Pingala. These are Nadis. Tentatively, some take these as the right and the left sympathetic cords, but they are subtle tubes that carry Prana. The Moon moves in the Ida and the Sun in the Pingala. Ida is cooling. Pingala is heating. Ida flows through the left nostril and the Pingala through the right nostril. The breath flows through the right nostril for one hour and then through the left nostril for one hour. Man is busily engaged in worldly activities, when the breath flows through Ida and Pingala. When Sushumna operates, he becomes dead to the world, and enters into Samadhi. Sushumna is the most important of all the Nadis. It is the sustainer of the universe and the path of the universe and the path of salvation. Situated at the back of the anus, it is attached to the spinal column and extends to the Brahmarandhra of the head and is invisible and subtle. The real work of a Yogi begins when Sushumna begins to function. Sushumna runs along the centre of the spinal cord or spinal column. Above the genital organs and below the navel is the Kanda, of the shape of a bird's egg. There arise from it all the Nadis number. Of these, seventy-two are common and generally known. Of those the chief ones are ten and they carry the Pranas. Ida, Pingala, Sushumna, Gandhari, Hastijihva, Pusa, Yusasvini, Alambusa, Kuhuh and Sankhini are said to be the ten important Nadis. The Yogis should have a knowledge of the Nadis and the Chakras. When Prana moves in Sushumna, sit for meditation. You will have deep Dhyana. If the coiled-up energy, Kundalini, passes up along the Sushumna Nadi and is taken up from Chakra to Chakra, the Yogi gets different sorts of experiences, powers and Ananda.

    When the Nadis have become purified, certain external signs appear on the body of the Yogi. They are lightness of the body, brilliancy in complexion, increase of the gastric fire, leanness of the body, and along with these, the absence of restlessness in the body. They are all signs of purification.

    Only the yogi can know the fine demarcation between body and mind, mind and soul, and become master of himself. By samyama on the navel plexus, knowledge of the body's constitution is obtained. Using the throat as a point of inquiry for samyama provides an understanding of thirst and hunger. This enables one to control their extreme symptoms.In yogic terminology the navel chakra is called manipuraka. It is the third major chakra when counting these from the bottom of the spine. By completing the course of hatha yoga, a yogi curbs this chakra.

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