॥३॥ विभूतिपाद - 3. Vibhūti Pāda - Manifestation



results: 31 - 40 of 56 from chapter 3

  • 3.31 : कण्ठकूपे क्षुत्पिपासानिवृत्तिः॥३१॥
  • 31. Kaṇṭha kūpe kṣut pipāsā nivṛttiḥ.
  • By sarhyama on the pit of the throat, the yogi overcomes hunger and thirst.
  • Advanced yogis can control hunger and thirst—this has been proved under modern scientific scrutiny. Kantha kitpa represents the visuddhi chakra situated in the region of the pit of the throat. (Certain mudras, for instance kaka mudra and khecari mudra, helps to defeat hunger and thirst). Samyama on the chest area and inquiry into the sensations felt there in different physical and mental states gives one the means to remain stable and calm even in very stressful situations. The practice of suppressing hunger and thirst is part of Hatha yoga. The purpose of this is to get the life force to cease its independent activities. A hatha yogi endeavors to bring the life force under his control, not to stop it from functioning but to cease its independent activities which are counter productive to the aims of yoga. Thus one, by one, a yogi surcharges and subsequently purifies the energy gyrating centers (chakras) one by one, beginning at the base of the spine. A yogi does cause his hunger and thirst to be suppressed initially when he sets out to control those urges, but over a time of practice, his subtle body changes and the urges for solid and liquid food go away. This is because the attitude of the throat chakras become changed permanently.


    When my wife took her exam in Reiki, the old Guru gave her his quartz tetrahydron dowser , and told her to douse his body and find out which chakra of his body needs speeding up. She found a weak Manipura , and thus got her 4th degree ( one step above Grandmaster ). Chakra in Sanskrit means wheeling vortex . Chakras are focal points where psychic forces and bodily functions interact with each other. They are transceivers of SCALAR energy. ).  Longitudinal Scalar waves are so fine that they are only one-hundred-millionth of a square centimeter in width hence finer than X-rays and gamma rays. Scalar waves can produce a great repelling force on the atomic nucleus, bypassing the outer electron shells, directly engineering or interfering with the components of the nucleus. Scalar waves operate in a non-linear time dimension which is hyperspace, at any speed from zero to infinity, as they are not limited to the speed of light. Secondary fields caused by the motion of subatomic particles interacting with Zero Point Field or Aakasha or Ether are called Scalar waves. They are not electromagnetic and hence don’t have direction or spin. Scalar waves can travel faster than light. Scalar waves encode the information of space and time into a timeless spaceless quantum shorthand of interference patterns. Electrons get their energy to whiz around the nucleus of an atom without slowing down because they  tap quantum fluctuations of empty space. There are seven chakras or energy centres. These chakras cannot be seen by the sight sense of the common man. Each of these 7 chakras are associated with a specific colour, organ, gland, mantra and frequency. The lowest is Muladhara at the base of the spine, and the highest is Sahasrara at the top of your head. The Muladhara encircles a mysterious divine potency called Kundalini, which can be raised by Yoga and meditation, chakra by chakra, till it reaches the Sahasrara. A overwhelming bliss is felt , which mystically represents re-integration with Atman or the eternal essence of self. With awakened Kundalini telepathy is possible.Chakras can then send out information carrying Soliton waves, which do not attenuate.  The Indian sage has exploded into a space of consciousness in which inner awareness is spontaneous. Cosmic consciousness is an intellectual enlightenment or illumination, an undescribable state of moral and intellectual elevation, a feeling of amazing bliss.When your perception opens up you can talk to trees. When meditating if tingling happens in your body, it means some rearrangements are taking place in your energy. The Muladhara chakra ( root ) hangs outside your body between your thighs , just beneath your scrotum. The Sahasrara chakra ( crown ) is located on top of your head. The remaining chakras are aligned within your body . The aura is created and nourished by the energy brought in through chakras. A chakra that rotates anti-clockwise is a ‘closed’ chakra--not conducive to the intake of energy. Normally the chakras spin very fast, sucking the universal energy into our body. However, as we grow older we develop negative patterns of thinking and living that slow down of some or all of the chakras and sometimes even impede their direction, causing an energy imbalance that results in various diseases. You can feel the influence of the chakras with the help of a pendulum, as it will start rotating on its own under the influence of any of the chakras when brought near that chakra’s field.  When these chakras are not spinning at their optimal speed, their respective characteristics can be adversely affected. Trying to suppress or deny emotions freely often results in blocks in the corresponding chakras--so do not hide your emotions from yourself, even if you decide for some reason to hide them from others. When your chakras are out of balance nothing seems to go all right, and you have a sense of depression. You can douse your chakras with Tetrahydron Quartz. Dousing is the easiest of all ESP. The crown chakra reaches down until its vortex touches the pineal gland. Kundalini starts its ascent towards the head center after responding to the vibrations from the 'light in the head. Introversion is neccessary for self-realization. Inner attention magnetizes “spiritual light” into the pineal gland. Human thought is the result of suspended action, and the pineal gland inhibits the immediate discharging of thoughts into action. This inhibition causes us to look inward and to deeply ponder our actions and reactions. When an area of quantum coherence collapses, an instant of consciousness occurs.  The real nervous system operates by means of synaptic messages. The virtual one operates by means of the quantum effect of tunneling (particles passing through an energy barrier that classically they should not be able to climb). The real one is driven by classical laws, the virtual one by quantum laws. Consciousness is therefore driven by quantum laws. With the advent of powerful new tools like femtosecond (10-15 second) lasers and nanoscale-precision positioning, life’s quantum dance is finally coming into view.  Our creative power to reverse entropy and heal still lies within us. We all have stem cells in our body that can make new healthy cells. Life can re-create Life, NOW. All we need to do is neutralize the electromagnetic charges held in our fields that disrupt our natural state of perfection. In quantum physics all things are seen as possibility waves.  And it is consciousness that changes these possibility waves into actuality. Everything is made of energy, including thoughts, feelings, emotions, sensations, and associations. Remember, chakras dictate all physical, mental, emotional and spiritual processes that take place in your body. Every chakra is a transmitter cum receiver antenna. A vedic sage with 12 strand DNA (nil junk ) and a king sized pineal gland , with chakras on overdrive and golden aura , can do wonders. There is a difference between a sage and a saint. A healthy clean aura means a healthy body.  The human aura is egg shaped. Auras can also be diagnosed with the help of quartz pendulums or with sensitized hands. The seventh layer of the evolved yogi’s aura represents the divine mind, and is made up of  high-frequency, bright golden energy lines. Extending three-and-a-half feet from the body, these golden lines form the matrix for all the physical components of our bodies. With a well developed seventh kosha, we start seeing and feeling the hidden divine perfection. A hidden purpose appears in every seemingly imperfect event or item around you, resulting in serenity of mind. At this level you hold your core beliefs, which may or may not be in harmony with the universal laws. All of our creative ideas flow from this level and give a sense of purpose to them. 

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.32 : कूर्मनाड्यां स्थैर्यम्॥३२॥
  • 32. Kūrmanāḍyām sthairyaṁ.
  • By sarhyama on kurmanadi, at the pit of the throat, the yogi can make his body and mind firm and immobile like a tortoise.
  • Though human cannot hibernate like bears , the advanced Yogi can do much more. By mastery over kurma nadi, the yogi not only keeps his physical body immobile like a tortoise,  but also has the power to hibernate mentally by entirely immobilising the functions of the body and intellect. Kurma nadi corresponds to the epigastric region. The functions of the body are performed by five types of vital energy, prana vayus - prana, apana, samana, udana and vyana. Prana moves in the thoracic region and controls breathing. Apana moves in the lower abdomen and controls excretion of urine, semen and faeces. Samana stirs up the gastric fire, assisting digestion and maintaining the harmonious functioning of the abdominal organs. Udana, working in the throat, controls the vocal chords and the intake of air and food. Vyana penetrates the entire body, distributing energy from the breath and food through the arteries, veins and nerves. There are also five upavayus known as upa-pranas. They comprise - naga, krkara, devadatta, dhanamjaya and kurma. Naga alleviates pressure of the abdomen by burping; krkara prevents substances from passing up the nasal passages and down the throat by making one sneeze or cough. Devadatta causes yawning and induces sleep. Dhanamjaya produces phlegm, nutrifies the body, remains in it even after death and sometimes inflates a corpse. Kurma controls the movements of the eyelids and regulates the intensity of light for seeing by controlling the size of the iris. The eyes are the index of the brain. Any movement in the brain is reflected in the eyes. By tranquillising the eyes, i.e., by the control of kurma vayu, one can still one's thoughts and make one's brain immobile . In yoga texts one can read of the main nadis, such as ida, pihgala, susumna, citra, gandhari, hastijihva, pusa, yasasvini, alumbusa, kuhii, sarasvati, varuni, viiodhari, payasvim, sahkhim, subha, kausiki, sura, raka, vijnana, kurma and many others.

    One's mental functions revolve mainly around lust, anger, greed, infatuation, pride and envy, considered the enemies of the soul.   By mastery over the kurma nadi, the yogi stops the movements of these six spokes of the mind, which are influenced by the qualities of sattva, rajas and lamas. He brings these enemies of the soul to a state of steadiness, and through the dominance of sattva guna, transforms them into friends. He remains like a tortoise in his shell, his emotional centre undisturbed, under every circumstance. He has developed emotional stability, the prerequisite of spiritual realisation. By samyama on the kurma nadi (a subtle tortoise-shaped tube located below the throat), motionlessness in the meditative posture is achieved. By samyama on the tortoise channel, below the throat, steadiness is attained. Unless one can keep his body in a steady pose, preferably the padmasana lotus posture, and also have the bodily urges like hunger quelled completely, he cannot enter into samadhi. The kurmanadi is supposed to be located below the gullet. In other words if one has not stilled the gross and subtle nerves in this area, having mastered Hatha Yoga, one will not be able to enter samadhi. When those nerves are stilled, the life force gives up its effort to protect and overly maintain the lower part of the body, the part which is lower than the neck. Unless the life force can be relieved from its creature survival duties, it does not allow the person to enter samadhi.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.33 : मूर्धज्योतिषि सिद्धदर्शनम्॥३३॥
  • 33. Mūrdha jyotiṣi siddha darśanaṁ.
  • By performing samyama on the light of the crown of the head (fajna cakra), the yogi has visions of perfected beings.
  • A yogi can develop a balanced head and a poised heart, and from his visions of siddhas, yogis and acharyas (great teachers) he may obtain guidance and inspiration to further his sadhana. By samyama on the coronal light of the head, visions of the siddhas, the masters can come. Visions of the perfected ones comes by following the inner coronal light of the crown of the head, whether encountered at the crown or through the ajna chakra, the eyebrow center. By samyama on the light at the crown of the head (sahasrara chakra), visions of masters and adepts are obtained. Murdhajyotish is known otherwise as jnanadipa. It is a light seen in the front central head of the subtle body. This light is the energized buddhi organ. In its normal stage in a human being, it is dark and cloudy, like a filament of a light bulb which gets insufficient current. The insufficient current warms the filament but does not cause it to glow noticeable. When the yogi masters pranayama and perfects himself in the disciplines of kundalini and celibacy yoga, his buddhi organ gets sufficiently charged. It glows with shining light (jyotisi), otherwise it remains dull but is felt as the centre of the mind, as ones ability to understand, analyses, plan and draw conclusions. He can take advices and get rare kriya yoga practices from those siddhas whom he is allowed to perceive. Such a yogin does not rely on physical contact with a yoga guru. Hence he does not have to have a guru who uses a physical form. He takes initiation either physically or subtle from these teachers. The reddish grey pineal gland is located in the geometric center of the brain. It is located directly behind the eyes. The pineal gland is a super conducting resonator which has mystical powers. Once the third eye is developed it is far more powerful than any of your 5 human senses. Though it is not part of the brain, the pineal gland develops from the roof of the diencephalon, a section of the brain, and functions as a light receptor.  The pineal gland is the evolutionary forerunner of the modern eye. The nerves that serve the pineal gland don't originate in the brain but in the sympathetic nervous system. The pineal gland can be activated by activated by sunlight, and also by sound resonance. It controls the various biorhythms of the body. It can discern negative energies, based on perception of vibrating energies around you. It plays a major role in hibernation of animals, metabolism, and seasonal breeding. In humans it affects circadian rhythms, sleep patterns ( melatonin levels increase at night), and is implicated in seasonal affective disorder. The pineal gland is a photosensitive organ and thus an important timekeeper for the human body. Pineal activation awakens normally latent neural pathways. Nerve fibers leave the pineal and make synaptic connections with other brain sites through traditional nerve-to-nerve connections.

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  • 3.34 : प्रातिभाद्वा सर्वम्॥३४॥
  • 34. Prātibhād vā sarvaṁ.
  • Through the faculty of spiritual perception, the yogi becomes the knower of all knowledge -- Vibhuti Pada.
  • A yogi can intuitively perceive anything and everything. By samyama on the radiant light, he becomes the knower of all knowledge. All knowledge is mirrored in a yogi. In short, as day succeeds dawn, impulsive nature is transformed into intuitive thought, by which the yogi possesses universal knowledge. It is the conquest of nature.When a man has risen to a high state of Pratibha, he has that great light. All things are apparent to him. Everything comes to him naturally without making Samyama.Through the faculty of spiritual perception the yogi becomes the knower of all knowledge.This pratibha is the brahmarandra development in the head of the subtle body of a yogi. At first a yogi develops the top part of the subtle body which is known as the brahmarandra.  Patanjali used the terms, pratibha which literally means relating to divination or genius. A yogi  who has developed his brahmarandra is liberated even while using a gross body.

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  • 3.35 : हृदये चित्तसंवित्॥३५॥
  • 35. Hṛdaye citta saṁvit.
  • By samyama on the region of the heart, the yogi acquires a thorough knowledge of the contents and tendencies of consciousness.
  • By samyama, a yogi can become aware of consciousness and of true, pure knowledge. He learns to unfold and tap the source of his being, and identify himself with the Supreme. By samyama on the heart, the knowledge of the mind-stuff is obtained. A person whose mind is jumpy, whose emotions are reactive and who is still linked to the cultural affairs of this world, cannot develop Samadhi.

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  • 3.36 : सत्त्वपुरुषयोरत्यन्तासंकीर्णयोः प्रत्ययाविशेषो भोगः परार्थान्यस्वार्थसंयमात् पुरुषज्ञानम्॥३६॥
  • 36. Sattva puruṣayor atyantāsaṁkīrṇayoḥ pratyayāviśeṣo bhogḥ parārthāt svārthasaṁyamāt puruṣajñānaṁ.
  • By samyama, the yogi easily differentiates between the intelligence and the soul, which is real and true.
  • Since it serves the purposes of the Self and nature, pure intelligence and the seer appear to be one, but they are quite dissimilar from each other. By samyama on that which exists for itself, comes knowledge of the soul. The refined, illuminative intelligence (sattva buddhi) is free from egoism. It is quite dissimilar from the light of the soul. Samyama on one's own self brings to light the difference between intelligence and self and coronates the yogi with the knowledge of the soul. This sutra, by the use of the word svartha for the seer and parartha for the intelligence, clearly illustrates the difference between the two. Failure to differentiate between them leads to entanglement in worldly pleasures. Knowing the distinction enables one to enter the gates of the soul.  Though the refined illuminative intelligence is the summit of nature, it is subject to diverse experiences. The soul being immutable, its light is constant, steady and unalterable. To the sadhaka, the intellect appears to be purusa. By samyama, the yogi has to disentangle the knot that binds the intellect and the self, and isolate the refined intelligence. From this follows isolation of the senses, mind and ego, and ultimately the release of the light of the soul. Samyama on the pure consciousness, which is distinct from the subtlest aspect of mind, reveals knowledge of that pure consciousness. The power of non-attachment acquired through purity gives the Yogi the enlightenment called Pratibha.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.37 : ततः प्रातिभश्रावणवेदनादर्शास्वादवार्ता जायन्ते॥३७॥
  • 37. Tatḥ prātibha śrāvaṇa vedanādarśāsvāda vārtā jāyante.
  • Through that spiritual perception, the yogi acquires the divine faculties of hearing, touch, vision, taste and smell. He can even generate these divine emanations by his own will.
  • Through the dawning of the self-luminous light of intuitive understanding, divine perceptions in hearing, feeling, seeing, tasting and smelling, beyond the range of ordinary perceptions, arise of their own accord. Our 5 senses have a narrow bandwidth and are deliberately squelched to prevent overload and mental breakdown.  As the mind is the centre of the functions of the senses of perception, it restricts their powers of hearing, feeling, seeing, tasting and smelling. When the limitations of the mind are removed, the yogi contacts the very core of his being, and has direct, divine perceptions, independent of the sense organs. He is able to hear, feel, see, taste and smell through unlimited space.

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  • 3.38 : ते समाधावुपसर्गा व्युत्थाने सिद्धयः॥३८॥
  • 38. Te samādhāvupasargā vyutthāne siddhayḥ.
  • These attainments are impediments to samadhi, although they are powers in active life.
  • Divine perceptions are hindrances to a yogi, whose wisdom is supreme and whose goal is spiritual absorption. They are great accomplishments, but he should know that they fall within the range of the gunas of nature, and in acquiring them, he might forget his main aim in life and luxuriate within them. If they are shunned, however, they become aids to samadhi. The yogi may mistake these accomplishments and rewards for the end and aim of yogic practices. He might imagine that he has attained great spiritual heights, and that whatever is attainable through yoga has been achieved. In this process, he can forget the goal of Self-Realisation. Patanjali warns yogis to treat these powers as impediments in their sadhana. One should control them as whole-heartedly as one fought earlier to conquer the afflictions of the body and fluctuations of the mind. Then one can move forward towards kaivalya, emancipation. These [superphysical senses] are obstacles to [nirbija] samadhi but are siddhis (powers or accomplishments) in the worldly pursuits. By inquiring into the cause of this rigid situation binding the mind to the individual and examining the means of relaxing this rigidity there is great potential for an individual to reach beyond the confines of himself. The allurements of the external world pale by comparison to the allurements of the subtle world, where these so-called attainments, powers, and psychic abilities abound. On the inner journey it is therefore imperative to increasingly, gently, systematically cultivate the levels of non-attachment or vairagya , all the way up to supreme non-attachment or paravairagya. Experiences such as those described in the Yoga Sutras exist, and naturally start to come along the way. Saying that they are renounced does not mean they go away. Rather, it means they become a responsibly used part of the yogi's way of engaging with the outer and inner world. The abilities are there, and become as much a part of life as are the grosser aspects of the senses (indriyas), including the jnanendriyas of smell, taste, sight, touch, and hearing, as well as the karmendriyas of elimination, procreation, motion, grasping, and speaking. Whether those gross senses or the subtle attainments are used with or without attachment is the question. These powers, however, are obstructions to the attainment of the highest goal, the knowledge of the pure Self, and freedom; these are, as it were, to be met in the way, and if the Yogi rejects them, he attains the highest. 

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  • 3.39 : बन्धकारणशैथिल्यात्प्रचारसंवेदनाच्च चित्तस्य परशरीरावेशः॥३९॥
  • 39. Bandhakāraṇa śaithilyāt pracāra saṁvedanāc ca cittasya paraśarīrāveśḥ.
  • Through relaxation of the causes of bondage, and the free flow of consciousness, the yogi enters another's body at will.
  • A perfect yogi can enter the body of another individual or, in order to free himself from the bondage of karmas, can leave his own body at will. The yogi's consciousness can enter the body of another when the cause of bondage (karmasaya) ceases and the knowledge of moving from one body into another is acquired. This is the conquest of the element of earth. Over all, a student yogi should not endeavor for this parasariravesah siddhi since it is very dangerous and can be done only by the most advanced Yogis . 

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  • 3.40 : उदानजयाज्जलपङ्ककण्टकादिष्वसङ्ग उत्क्रान्तिश्च॥४०॥
  • 40. Udāna jayāj jala paṅka kaṇṭakādiṣvasaṅga utkrāntiś ca.
  • By mastery of udana vayu, the yogi can walk over water, swamps and thorns without touching them. He also has the power of levitation.
  • He can make prana ascend through brahmarandhra and thus die at will. Prana is usually translated as 'breath', yet this is only one of its manifestations in the human body. If breathing stops, so does life. Ancient Indian sages knew that all functions of the body were performed by five types of vital energy (prana vayus) - prana, apana, samana, udana and vyana. They are specific aspects of the one vital cosmic force, the primordial principle of existence in every being. In pranayama, prana vayu is activated by the inbreath and apana vayu by the outbreath. Vyana is essential for the working of prana and apana, due to it being the medium for transferring energies from one to the other. Udana raises energy from the lower spine to the brain. This sutra explains the powers gained by the yogi who masters udana vayu - he raises the energy, and is then able to walk over water. By mastering samana one can experience sensations of excessive heat. Udana is the name of the nerve current that governs the lungs, and all the upper parts of the body, and when he is master of it he becomes light in weight.

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