॥३॥ विभूतिपाद - 3. Vibhūti Pāda - Manifestation



results: 41 - 50 of 56 from chapter 3

  • 3.41 : समानजयाज्ज्वलनम्॥४१॥
  • 41. Samānajayāj jvalanaṁ.
  • By samyama on samana vayu, a yogi glows like fire and his aura radiates.
  • By the conquest of samana vayu, the yogi gains control over the element of fire (tejastatwd). The middle of the torso is the region of samana, which stokes the gastric fire, assisting in digestion and maintaining harmonious functioning of the abdominal organs. It controls the working of the heart, and through it, the life force. By mastery over samana, the prana flowing in the navel area, there comes effulgence, radiance, or fire. Samana vayu is one of the five vayus. It operates from the navel area, deals with digestion, and allows the mental discrimination between useful and not useful thoughts. Conquest of the samana digestive force comes by the practice of kundalini yoga When a yogi on the upward purification course,purifies his navel region, he experiences frontal kundalini. It is then that he achieves conquest over the samana digestive fire. His subtle body then appears with an orangish fiery glow. By mastery over the samana nerve current (the equalizing vital air) comes radiance to surround the body. Active at the navel center—midway between the realms of prana vayu in the chest and apana vayu in the pelvis—samana vayu is a concentrating, absorbing, and consolidating force. Its main function is assimilation of prana in all its forms—like a power station, samana collects energy absorbed through breath, food, sensory perception, and mental experiences and processes it to empower all aspects of life. In the energetic body, samana is concentrated at the navel center (manipura chakra)—the center for the transformative power of the fire element. As the hub of pranic energy and vitality, the navel center is essential to hatha yoga, which aims to increase prana and transform the patterns of pranic flow in the body. Asana practice in particular is designed to draw downward-moving apana up to the navel center, and upward-moving prana vayu down to the navel center, uniting these two opposing energies to awaken samana. This integrating action strengthens the body, balances the mind, and stabilizes instinctive urges like hunger and sex so we can more easily regulate them. It gives us the clarity and courage to truly see ourselves, and the motivation and power to transform our habits and karmic tendencies. Samana vayu, or “balancing air,” is the prana vayu at the meeting point between prana, the inward/upward-moving vayu, and apana, the outward/downward-moving vayu. Samana vayu unites these two energies together. Located at the navel, samana vayu governs agni, the digestive fire, or fire of purification. This fire burns adequately when prana and apana unite in samana. Samana vayu is related to Manipura chakra located at the solar plexus. It is responsible for the processing and assimilation of all that is taken in—food, emotions, perceptions, and breath. Samana is used to assimilate these energies so that they can be used optimally.  An imbalance of samana vayu presents as health conditions including digestive disturbances, slow metabolism, malnourishment, or obesity. In our daily lives, if we are feeling out of balance, samana is likely to be affected. Pranayama practices that balances inhalation with exhalation are helpful as a way to balance samana. By matching the length and depth of each inhalation and exhalation, prana meets apana, thereby helping to balance samana. Samana vayu is a centralizing force of energy (centripetal) that draws from the periphery to the navel in a spiraling action. Its main function is to support digestion physically (food, nutrients), energetically (prana), emotionally and mentally (thoughts and feelings) and spiritually (intuition, inner guidance, wisdom). It is Udana Vayu that separates the astral body from the physical body at the time of death. By control over this current he becomes very, very light. In conjunction with Prana Vayu, Udana plays an important part in governing the motion of lungs. The body of the Yogi who has mastered the current Samana Vayu is effulgent. He can create fire out of his body. Sage Sarabhanga after having Darshan of Sri Rama, created fire out of his physical body, burnt his physical body in this Yogic fire .

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.42 : श्रोत्राकाशयोः संबन्धसंयमाद्दिव्यं श्रोत्रम्॥४२॥
  • 42. Śrotrākāśayoḥ saṁbandhasaṁyamād divyam śrotraṁ.
  • By sarhyama on the relation between space and sound, the yogi acquires the power of hearing distant and divine sounds. The organ of hearing, the ear, grasps sound in space. This is the conquest of akasha
  • The entire Vedas ( SRUTI ) were heard by seers while in their meditative trances. The inner ear gives the cycloid spiral space curve motion. Vedic seers used the inner ear method for bending space time.  By samyama over the relation between akasha (one of the five elements) and the power of hearing, the higher, divine power of hearing comes.

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  • 3.43 : कायाकाशयोः संबन्धसंयमाल्लघुतूलसमापत्तेश्चाकाशगमनम्॥४३॥
  • 43. Kāyākāśayoḥ saṁbandha saṁyamāllaghu tūla samāpatteścākāśagamanaṁ.
  • By knowing the relationship between the body and ether, the yogi transforms his body and mind, so that they become as light as cotton fibre. He can then levitate in space. This is the conquest of ether.
  • This is one of the supernatural powers called laghima, or becoming as light as cotton. While sutra 3.40 described levitation, this sutra describes moving through space. The samyama allows a releasing or a cessation of the process of heaviness or earth element. Then, the natural lightness is experienced. It is not that a new quality of lightness is being attained or added on. Rather, it is a ceasing to be connected with the quality of earth or heaviness of body. This does not  mean levitation of the physical body. It means the use of the subtle body.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.44 : बहिरकल्पिता वृत्तिर्महाविदेहा ततः प्रकाशावरणक्षयः॥४४॥
  • 44. Bahirakalpitā vṛttirmahāvidehā tatḥ prakāśāvaraṇakṣayḥ.
  • By samyama on mahavideha (the disembodied state), where consciousness functions outside the body, the veil covering the light of illumination is destroyed.
  • It is a siddhi, called mahavideha siddhi. The yogi in this state possesses true and pure intelligence. If consciousness moves outside the body, but stays in the body, it is called an conceivable state. When the same consciousness moves outside the body, independent of and without abiding in it, it is an inconceivable state. In mahavideha, the yogi disengages his body from consciousness, so that sufferings do not influence him. He is beyond the gunas. In this non-attached state, cilia turns divine and universal and can absorb anything in space without the use of the body, senses, or ego. By samyama on thought waves unidentified by and external to the body [maha-videha, or the great bodilessness], the veil over the light of the Self is destroyed. When the formless thought patterns of mind are projected outside of the body, it is called maha-videha, a great disincarnate one. By samyama on that outward projection, the veil over the spiritual light is removed.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.45 : स्थूलस्वरूपसूक्ष्मान्वयार्थवत्त्वसंयमाद भूतजयः॥४५॥
  • 45. Sthūla svarūpa sūkṣmānvayārthavattva saṁyamād bhūta jayḥ.
  • By samyama on the elements - their mass, forms, subtlety, conjunction and purposes, the yogi becomes Lord over them all.
  • By restraint, the yogi gains control over the gross and subtle elements of nature, their forms and gunas, as well as their purpose. The Universe is created from the constituents of the basic elements of nature - earth (prthvi), water (ap), fire (tejas), air (vayu) and ether (akasa). Each element possesses five attributes - mass (sthula), subtlety (suksma), form (svarupa), all-pervasiveness or interpenetration (anvaya), and purpose or fruition (arthavatva).  The characteristics of the gross forms of elements comprise solidity, fluidity, heat, mobility and volume. Their subtle counterparts are smell, taste, sight, touch and sound. Their all-pervasiveness or interpenetration are the three gunas, and their purpose is either worldly enjoyment or freedom and beatitude. The earth element has five properties of sound, touch, sight, taste and smell. Water possesses four - sound, touch, sight and taste. Fire has three - sound, touch and sight. Air comprises sound and touch. Ether has only the one quality of sound . By samyama on the gross and subtle elements and on their essential nature, correlations and purpose, mastery over them is gained. When the elements are mastered one is no longer disturbed by them. The body reaches perfection and extraordinary capabilities become possible. By making Samyama on the gross and fine forms of the elements, their essential traits, the inherence of the Gunas in them and on their contributing to the experience of the soul, comes mastery of the elements.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.46 : ततोऽणिमादिप्रादुर्भावः कायसंपत्तद्धर्मानभिघातश्च॥४६॥
  • 46. Tato’ṇimādi prādurbhāvḥ kāyasaṁpat taddharmānabhighātaśca.
  • From that arises perfection of the body, the ability to resist the play of the elements, and powers such as minuteness.
  • From samyama on the elements, their counterparts, forms, conjunctions and fruits, the yogi develops the eight supernatural powers and gains perfect wealth of the body without falling victim to the obstacles posed by the elements. This is believed to be the best wealth of the body - perfection and freedom from all hindrances. This sutra points that by the conquest of the elements, a yogi gains mastery in three fields. The first is the acquisition of the eight supernatural powers. The second is perfection of the body, which means that earth does not grime him, water dampen him, or fire burn him. Wind cannot move him and space can obscure his body anywhere, at any time. The third is immunity from the play of the elements and their characteristics, and from the obstructions and disturbances which they create. He can reach anything he likes, he can rule everything he wants, he can conquer everything he wants, and so on. A lion will sit at his feet like a lamb, and all his desires will be fulfilled at will. From minuteness and other related mystic skills come the perfection of the subtle body and the non-obstructions of its functions. When the yogi develops the mystic skills, he finds that the subtle body is perfected to such a degree that the nadis, subtle tubes within it carry a subtle fluid which is as crystal clear as pure water. From certain dimensions this appears to be liquid light traveling through the subtle body of the yogi. Some of this purity filters into the gross body and the yogi is said to perform miracles. Perfection in the body means good features, attractiveness to others, physical firmness, and unusual physical strength.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.47 : रूपलावण्यबलवज्रसंहननत्वानि कायसंपत्॥४७॥
  • 47. Rūpa lāvaṇyabalavajrasaṁhananatvāni kāyasaṁpat.
  • Perfection of the body consists of beauty, grace, strength, compactness and the hardness and brilliance of a diamond.
  • In advanced yoga practice, kaya is the subtle body ( not the physical body ) , the temporary but long lasting body which the yogin must perfect before he can attain liberation. When the subtle body is upgraded by the practice of kundalini yoga, it attains beauty of form, mystic force and diamond-like definition. It attains clarity in it. Its colors become free from cloudiness and vague. It moves into the higher pranic force. It is experienced as a sattva guna body, a form of the mode of pure goodness. Beauty, grace, strength, and adamantine hardness constitute bodily perfection. This perfection of the body includes beauty, gracefulness, strength, and adamantine hardness in taking the blows that come. The body becomes indestructible. Nothing can injure it. Nothing can destroy it until the Yogi wishes. “Breaking the rod of time he lives in this universe with his body.” In the Vedas it is written that for that man there is no more disease, death or pain.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.48 : ग्रहणस्वरूपास्मितान्वयार्थवत्त्वसंयमादिन्द्रियजयः॥४८॥
  • 48. Grahaṇa svarūpāsmitānvayārthavattva saṁyamād indriya jayḥ.
  • Through samyama upon the purpose of the conjunction of the process of knowing, the ego, and nature, there is mastery over the senses.
  • By samyama upon the natural states of the senses of perception, their function and receptivity, with or without their conjunction with nature and the perception of the individual self (tumtta), the yogi recognises the purpose of the alignment of nature, senses and self and gains mastery over them all. Here Patanjali describes the five specific qualities, particularly in relation to the senses of perception and the ego. The properties of the senses of perception include - knowing their own natural state; cognition or recognition of external objects; the reason for this contact; and the involvement of the individual self in these states, which changes it from objective to subjective. Everything one experiences in the universe is transmitted through the medium of the senses to the 'I' consciousness. The senses by their essential nature are attracted to worldly objects conducive to pleasure, and their hunger for more and more entangles them. At some stage, when the senses are quelled, they and the organs of action become unreceptive, and a state of quietness is experienced. An ordinary individual will go on following the senses when they are again stirred to their pursuit of pleasure, but the sophisticated intelligence will ponder, and consider that it is possible to turn inwards. This reflection on the receptivity of the senses and mind can now be diverted and directed by the intelligence toward exploring the realm of the seer so that senses, mind and ego are brought to rest permanently in the abode of the soul. By samyama on the process of perception and action, essence, I-ness, connectedness, and purposefulness of senses and acts, mastery over those senses and acts (indriyas) is attained. Samyama on the five cognitive senses or means of perception (jnanendriyas) brings mastery over those senses. Samyama on the five means of actions (karmendriyas) brings mastery over those means of action. However, these practices of samyama are purposively done in conjunction with ones own individuality and essence. It is the samyama on the relationship, which is the key. Repeatedly, the nature of relationship is examined in the Yoga Sutras, so that the false identities can be broken, allowing the true Self to be experienced , beyond the layers of ignorance or avidya. Sensual energy is subtle and moves at a rapid rate to execute its functions. It is mostly involuntary, which means that it operates on its own. This makes it difficult to track. . One must study how the sensual energy appropriates or grasps subtle phenomena. This is indicated by the term anvaya. One must study how the energy connects with and associates with various types of subtle and gross objects. One must know the form of the sensual energy, its swarupa. This is its form when it does not assume the identity of other objects. One should understand its nature for identification as well as its worth to the self. When all this is achieved, then the yogi gains mastery over his relationship to that sensual force.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.49 : ततो मनोजवित्वं विकरणभावः प्रधानजयश्च॥४९॥
  • 49. Tato manojavitvam vikaraṇabhāvḥ pradhānajayaśca.
  • By mastery over the senses of perception, the yogi's speed of body, senses and mind matches that of the soul, independent of the primary causes of nature. Unaided by consciousness, he subdues the first principle of nature (mahat).
  • When the properties of nature have been conquered, and both body and consciousness purified, the self perceives directly and quickly, independent of nature. Body, senses, mind and consciousness stand equal to the seer in their movements, and the soul drinks its own sweetness. The taste of honey is the same from whichever side of the honeycomb it is collected. Likewise, the organs of action and senses of perception, body and mind are made as pure as the soul, when they are transformed to the level of the soul. In this spiritual elation, they lose interest in sensual gratification and pleasure. Each cell reflects the light of pure Self and each cell drinks the nectar of the soul. This is madhu pranka.  When there is clear understanding of the difference between the Perceiver and the mind, all the various states of mind and what affects them become known. Then, the mind becomes a perfect instrument for the flawless perception of everything that need be known. By that mastery over the senses and acts (indriyas), there comes quickness of mind, perception with the physical instruments of perception, and mastery over the primal cause out of which manifestation arises.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 3.50 : सत्त्वपुरुषान्यताख्यातिमात्रस्य सर्वभावाधिष्ठातृत्वं सर्वज्ञातृत्वं च॥५०॥
  • 50. Sattvapuruṣānyatākhyātimātrasya sarvabhāvādhiṣṭhātṛtvam sarvajñātṛtvam ca.
  • Only one who knows the difference between the illuminative intelligence and the seer, attains supreme knowledge of all that exists and all that manifests.
  • The yogi distinguishes between intelligence, consciousness, ego and the soul. Through knowledge of the soul, he earns mastery over every state of manifestation and becomes master of all knowledge. He is omnipresent, omnipotent and omniscient.  He alone is the observer, perceiving everything directly, and he alone is the actor, independent of mind, senses of perception and organs of action.  To one well established in the knowledge of the distinction between the purest aspect of mind and consciousness itself, there comes supremacy over all forms or states of existence, as well as over all forms of knowing. Reaching the finest level of mind: In the preceding sutras (3.17-3.37, 3.39-3.49), many types of experience were described. As these are encountered, the yogi goes ever deeper into the levels of his or her own being. Each is encountered, explored, experienced, and set aside, so as to go still deeper. Finally comes the finest of the levels of individuality, the sattvic buddhi. Here, in this sutra, one not only experiences the discrimination between the subtlest aspect of mind and consciousness itself (purusha), this distinction becomes well established. Initially, buddhi is utilized as the means that decides, judges, and discriminates (2.26-2.29). When this discrimination is clouded, we act out of our habit patterns, not from choice. Eventually, we come to see that it was buddhi who carved up consciousness and the universe in the first place, experiencing the many dualities. Here, when the sutra speaks of discriminating between buddhi and purusha, this is what is being addressed. It is not referring to buddhi at the surface level, such as deciding what is useful and not useful in our life activities. Rather, it is the subtlest aspect of buddhi that is being discriminated as different from purusha. This is the discrimination that leads towards liberation .Only when there is distinct discrimination between the clarifying perception of material nature and the spiritual personality, does the yogi attain complete disaffection and all applicative intuition. In advanced yoga, or kriya yoga, one has to maintain the distinction between oneself and the perceiving instruments of the subtle body, even through initially one must take help from those truth yielding perceptions. Adhisthatrtvam means complete or full disaffection from the subtle influence of material nature, even from the clarifying powers which are so helpful. When nature has been conquered, and the difference between the Purusha and nature realised — that the Purusha is indestructible, pure and perfect — then come omnipotence and omniscience.

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