॥३॥ विभूतिपाद - 3. Vibhūti Pāda - Manifestation



results: 51 - 56 of 56 from chapter 3

  • 3.51 : तद्वैराग्यादपि दोषबीजक्षये कैवल्यम्॥५१॥
  • 51. Tadvairāgyādapi doṣabījakṣaye kaivalyam.
  • By destruction of the seeds of bondage and the renunciation of even these powers, comes eternal emancipation.
  • By renouncing the supernormal powers, the yogi reaches eternal emancipation. Indifference to all supernatural experiences annihilates the seed of sorrows and leads the yogi to live in his own self. If he does not reject them, he will be caught in the web of subtle miseries, and may find it extremely difficult to come out of them.  In 11.16, Patanjali spoke of afflictions and pains, which may affect the sadhaka at a later time through pride or want of understanding. Now that the sadhaka has acquired intellectual sensitivity, he is ready to hear that sufferings will instantly overwhelm one who succumbs to the temptation of the siddhis. If he fails to see their hidden perils, he ends up in sorrow. If he cultivates non-attachment to, and detachment from them, the seeds of sorrow, weakness or bondage that spring from siddha vidya are destroyed. From renunciation springs eternal emancipation, or unalloyed purity. This is kaivalya. The self now has achieved complete independence and abides in its own nature. The temptation to accept the respectful status as a consequence of acquiring knowledge through samyama should be restrained.  With non-attachment or desirelessness even for that supremacy over forms and states of existence and the omniscience (3.50), the seeds at the root of those bondages are destroyed, and absolute liberation is attained. He attains aloneness, independence, and becomes free. When one gives up even the ideas of omnipotence and omniscience, there comes entire rejection of enjoyment, of the temptations from celestial beings. When the Yogi has seen all these wonderful powers, and rejected them, he reaches the goal.  When the coloring (klishta) of this attachment to mastery over all forms and states of existence and omniscience is surrendered, and non-attachment ensues, there comes liberation. At the lesser levels of attainment, the non-attachment opens the door to the next subtler layer, for which the process must be repeated. However, at this subtlest level, there is no more level, so there is final liberation between consciousness and the many fluctuations of the mind field . So long as there is a mind it can be understood, but the goal is beyond even the mind.

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  • 3.52 : स्थान्युपनिमन्त्रणे सङ्गस्मयाकरणं पुनरनिष्टप्रसङ्गात्॥५२॥
  • 52. Sthānyupanimantraṇe saṇgasmayākaraṇam punaraniṣṭa prasaṅgāt.
  • When approached by celestial beings, there should be neither attachment nor surprise, because undesirable connections can happen again.
  • The yogi must maintain his hard-won freedom, and must not fall prey to temptations that can raze him down from the height of spirituality. There are four types of yogis. They are known as - prathama kalpika, madhubhumika, prajnajyoti and atikrantabhavamya. Prathama kalpika yogis have worked hard in their yogic practices, and the power of progress has just begun to dawn. Madhubhumika yogis have learned to distinguish between citta and the seer and try to achieve further mastery. (They are also called rtambhara prajnas.) The prajnajyotis have succeeded in subduing the elements of nature, the qualities of the senses of perception, mind and desires and have realised the seer, while the atikrantabhavamyas have attained the highest knowledge of the seer and have the power of olparavava-gya (highest dispassion). Patanjali warns all classes of yogis not to let themselves be lured into angelic 'traps', but to detach themselves from these divine temptations, so that their hearts have no room to hold unwelcome feelings and urges. As discrimination becomes increasingly finer, the levels of the subtle realm are experienced, including encounters with the disembodied or celestial beings. They might invite the sadhaka (practitioner) with the experiences of the subtle realm. These invitations, experiences, or powers are distractions, which block the realization of the true Self, which is beyond all experiences. Therefore, the invitations are declined in a spirit of non-attachment , as are the other subtle experiences .

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  • 3.53 : क्षणतत्क्रमयोः संयमाद्विवेकजं ज्ञानम्॥५३॥
  • 53. Kṣaṇa tat kramayoḥ saṁyamād vivekajam jñānaṁ.
  • By samyama on moment and on the continuous flow of moments, the yogi gains exhilarated knowledge, free from the limitations of time and space.
  • By samyama on the continuous flow of moments which move in a succession known as time, the yogi gets direct understanding of time and relativity. A moment in time is timeless, and that this timelessness is real and eternal, whereas its movement is restrained to the past and the future. Movement is timebound, transitory and ever-changing. The moment is everlasting, changeless, sacred - it is, in fact, the secret of samadhi. The moment is unconditioned reality, while the sequence of moments is conditioned reality; it is relative to the absolute and illusory. This realisation is termed 'exalted intelligence'. In moment, neither psychological nor chronological time is felt. Moment comes between rising impressions and their restraints and vice-versa - it is a quiet intervening state, auspicious and pure, and is to be stabilised, prolonged and expanded, so that consciousness becomes absolute. This is vivekajajnana- the gateway to kaivalya. The yogi is always aware of the moment and thus conquers psychological and chronological time. He remains attentive to the moment, and does not allow his attention to slip into the movement of moments. He remains undisturbed, and with the loss of the time factor, his consciousness, too, loses its implication. Then, he catches sight of the soul. This is vivekaja jnana, exalted intelligence - the secret and sacred knowledge. Bhagawad Gita teaches us to live in the present moment because it is all that one really has. The 'elsewhere' or 'otherwise' mentality, to which one is bound by psychological time, compels one to emasculate the present reality with the illusory unreality. By samyama on single moments in sequence comes discriminative knowledge.By samyama on moment and on the continuous flow of moments, the yogi gains exalted knowledge, free from the limitations of time and space. Experience usually comes like a movie. It only appears to be an unfolding process, whereas it is actually independent events. It is like the movie film being many independent frames, all of which coexist on the same reel. However, when you look at those frames sequentially, there is the appearance of a uniform and unfolding event or process. When samyama is done on the moments and the process of succession, the higher knowledge of what is really going on is revealed. One comes to see the nature of movie production of the mind and virtually the whole of the creation process. This opens the door to the realization of the Truth

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  • 3.54 : जातिलक्षणदेशैरन्यतानवच्छेदात् तुल्ययोस्ततः प्रतिपत्तिः॥५४॥
  • 54. Jāti lakṣaṇa deśairanyatānavacchedāt tulyayostatḥ pratipattiḥ.
  • By this knowledge the yogi is able to distinguish unerringly the differences in similar objects, which cannot be distinguished by rank, qualitative signs or position in space.
  • With this exalted intelligence the yogi is capable of distinguishing, faultlessly and instantaneously, the minutest differences between two similar kinds of things or objects, regardless of rank, creed, quality, place or space. A yogi who has accomplished spiritual realisation, possesses clarity and sensitivity even in the subtlest of things. He perceives all things distinctly and expresses himself faultlessly. This quality of intelligence cannot be possessed even by evolved souls unless they are anchored in the sacred divine spiritual knowledge - vivekaja jnanam. Such clarity is not exclusive of any object, any particular situation, or any moment. It is not the result of sequential logic. It is immediate, spontaneous, and total. The yogi has perception of two similar realties which otherwise could not be sorted due to a lack of definition in terms of their general category, individual characteristic and location. A yogi develops mystic clarity. The misery that we suffer comes from ignorance, from non-discrimination between the real and the unreal. We all take the bad for the good, the dream for the reality.  Non-discrimination is the cause of misery. It is caused by ignorance. When discrimination comes, it brings strength. The highest philosophy of the Yogi is based upon this fact, that the Purusa is pure and perfect, and is the only “simple” that exists in this universe. The body and mind are compounds, and yet we are ever identifying ourselves with them.  When this power of discrimination has been attained, man sees that everything in this world, mental and physical, is a compound, and, as such, cannot be the Purusa.

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  • 3.55 : तारकं सर्वविषयं सर्वथाविषयमक्रमं चेति विवेकजं ज्ञानम्॥५५॥
  • 55. Tārakam sarvaviṣayam sarvathāviṣayamakramam ceti vivekajam jñānaṁ.
  • The essential characteristic of the yogi's exalted knowledge is that he grasps instantly, clearly and wholly, the aims of all objects without going into the sequence of time or change.
  • Invigorated in understanding, clear in action, he dominates and transgresses nature and reaches, through yogic practices, the light of the soul. The discriminative knowledge that simultaneously comprehends all objects in all conditions is the intuitive knowledge which brings liberation. This discriminative knowledge delivers a man from the bondage of ignorance. It comprehends all objects simultaneously, at every moment of their existence and in all their modifications. Freedom is when the mind has complete identity with the Perceiver. That higher knowledge is intuitive and transcendent, and is born of discrimination; it includes all objects within its field, all conditions related to those objects, and is beyond any succession. The distinction caused by subtle discrimination is the crossing over or transcending of all subtle and gross mundane objects in all ways they are presented, without the yogi taking recourse to any other sequential perceptions of mind reliance. The higher knowledge is intuitive, transcendent, or coming from within. It is revealed by discrimination between objects, which rests on the ability to discriminate between moments and succession. Saying that the higher knowledge is intuitive means that it is self-existent rather than being constructed knowledge. Much of our worldly sense of knowledge comes from combining different pieces of information, much like we might combine different cooking skills and ingredients in a kitchen to construct a meal. However, the higher knowledge is not constructed, but revealed by stepping beyond the mere appearance of the moments and succession. Through the repeated process of discrimination, the higher truth is born or revealed. As the meditator experiences this truth beyond the objects, moments, and sequences, it becomes clear in direct experience that the higher knowledge contains, or oversees all of the many objects, their conditions, and sequences. It is seen that it is not a case where consciousness not only permeates the objects, conditions, and sequences, but actually is the supporting reality of their existence.  The whole of Prakriti in all its states, subtle and gross, is within the grasp of this knowledge. There is no succession in perception by this knowledge; it takes in all things simultaneously, at a glance.

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  • 3.56 : सत्त्वपुरुषयोः शुद्धिसाम्ये कैवल्यमिति॥५६॥
  • 56. Sattva puruṣayoḥ śuddhi sāṁye kaivalyam iti.
  • When the purity of intelligence equals the purity of the soul, the yogi has reached kaivalya - perfection in yoga.
  • When the vestures of the soul are equal in purity to that of the soul, harmony resides between them. There comes freedom, kaivalya, of the seer, uncontaminated by the qualities of nature. By yogic discipline, the veil of ignorance is lifted from intelligence. This is the real and true light - vivekaja jnanam, illuminative consciousness. It becomes equal to that of the light of the soul, purusa. The differentiation between intelligence and consciousness comes to an end. Both dissolve in the beacon light of the soul. They are isolated from contact with nature's objects. The seeds of suffering are burnt up. The vestures either become isolated and functionless, or are lifted to the level of their wearer. This is freedom. Now the Soul shines in its immaculate form, in its pure effulgence - it reigns supreme. This is kaivalya, the indivisible state of existence .Discrimination is the finer tool for attaining enlightenment, and is applied to the ever subtler levels of experience .Knowledge of the distinction between the purest aspect of mind (sattvic buddhi) and consciousness itself (purusha) brings supremacy over all forms or states of existence, as well as over all forms of knowing. Absolute liberation or kaivalya is the end, the final state of the Self in itself. Thus, the word iti is the last word of the sutra and of this

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