॥४॥ कैवल्यपाद - 4. Kaivalya Pāda - Liberation



results: 1 - 10 of 34 from chapter 4

  • 4.1 : जन्मौषधिमन्त्रतपःसमाधिजाःसिद्धयः॥१॥
  • 1. Janmauṣadhi mantra tapḥ samādhijāḥ siddhayḥ.
  • Accomplishments may be attained through birth, the use of herbs, incantations, self-discipline or samadhi.
  • There are five types of accomplished yogis (siddhayah): ---1. by aspiration to become perfect (janma) ,2. by spiritual experience gained through herbs, drugs or soma elixir (ausadha) ,3. by incantation of the name of one's desired deity (mantra) ,4. by ascetic devotional practice (tapas) ,5. by profound meditation (samadhi) ..There is an important distinction between these means of spiritual accomplishment. Followers of the first three may fall from the grace of yoga through pride or negligence. The others, whose spiritual gains are through tapas and samadhi, do not. They become masters, standing alone as divine, liberated souls, shining instances to mankind. For a Sadhaka, who is adept in Samyama, siddhis  are very normal. In fact, their frequent use gets him away from the best of all Siddhis, namely, Kaivalya.  Apart from Samyama, are there any other methods by which a sadhaka gets various Siddhis? The first is by birth. Lord Krishna has told Arjuna in the Bhagawad Gita that whatever attainments one comes to, in one birth, all these attainments come along with him into his next birth. They do not go waste. All of us are thus born with the gift of what we attained in our previous birth. It is just that it is not easily visible to all.. Someone may seem to have learnt something too very fast in this birth and is called precocious. But, this precociousness has come to him from his previous birth, based on his earlier karma and earlier attainments. While Mantra is focusing the sound power, tapah is focusing the mind waves or thought waves.  Siddhis (attainments, powers, perfections, subtle experiences, psychic abilities) are exposed from the subtle level by the thinning of the veils between the conscious and the unconscious. However, for the absolute reality to be realized, there also has to be non-attachment , and setting aside of experiences , so as to move ever closer to the direct experience of the center . Otherwise, removing the veil in one of these five ways can serve only to achieve subtle experiences and powers.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.2 : जात्यन्तरपरिणामः प्रकृत्यापूरात्॥२॥
  • 2. Jātyantarapariṇāmḥ prakṛtyāpūrāt.
  • The abundant flow of nature's energy brings about a transformation in one's birth, aiding the process of evolution.
  • Just as water can be transformed into vapour or ice, likewise, sufferings and fluctuations can be brought under control and transformed by crushing avidya. If a sadhaka fails to reach perfection during this life, nature may abundantly permeate and perfect his sadhana in the next, so that he may then experience freedom. The soul carries forward into the next life, its positive samskaras and impressions. This is the meaning of soul evolution. Many sages like Adi shankaracharya reached kaivalya during their lives here on earth without yogic sadhana, because of the fruits of yogic practices in their previous lives (jatyantara parinama). 

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.3 : निमित्तमप्रयोजकं प्रकृतीनां वरणभेदस्तु ततः क्षेत्रिकवत्॥३॥
  • 3. Nimittam aprayojakam prakṛtīnām varaṇabhedastu tatḥ kṣetrikavat.
  • Nature's efficient cause does not impel its potentialities into action, but helps to remove the obstacles to evolution, just as a farmer builds banks to irrigate his fields.
  • Culture of the germinated consciousness is of profound importance in yoga. As a farmer builds dykes between fields to regulate the flow of water via slice gates , evolved yogis channelise the rich flow of nature's energy to liberate themselves from the bondage of their actions and develop spiritual insight. Even if sadhana fails to give rise to complete transformation in the life of a sadhaka, it certainly serves to remove hindrances in the path of his soul evolution. Through yogic discipline, the yogi removes all obstacles to his evolution, and relishes emancipation. Thus disciplined, the yogi's enhanced energy spontaneously removes all fluctuations and afflictions which thwart his spiritual growth, enabling him to gain insight into his very being, his soul. In meditation, we are not trying to attain anything, but are trying to open the sluice gates. We cannot really attain anything in meditation, but can only realize what is already there. This is why the phrase Self-realization is used for enlightenment. Chitta vrittis create various obstacles to our sprouting into great Yogis. We only need to remove these obstacles one by one, process by process. The entire prakriti will help us to grow – only if we remove all the obstacles within us and a few outside us. Patanjali, declares that the true secret of evolution is the manifestation of the perfection which is already in every being; that this perfection has been barred, and the infinite tide behind it is struggling to express itself. These struggles and competitions are but the results of our ignorance, because we do not know the proper way to unlock the sluice gate and let the water in. 

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.4 : निर्माणचित्तान्यस्मितामात्रात्॥४॥
  • 4. Nirmāṇacittānyasmitāmātrāt.
  • Constructed or created mind springs from the sense of individuality (asmita).
  • Asmita is characterised by thoughts such as “I am better than you”, “I am right”, “I know more than you”. As humans we are all subject to asmita (ego). In fact we all need a little bit of ego to have a healthy view of ourselves! But when it becomes a dominant force in how we communicate and make decisions it can bring suffering to our lives.  From a sense of self-awareness, numerous activities become associated in one's consciousness, thereby giving rise to mental states called moods, which form themselves into nirmita, or cultivated citta. They ruin, distort and disturb the intelligence, creating various sufferings and fluctuations. If this distorted consciousness is re-channelled in the right direction, it develops sophistication and sensitivity. Then nirmita citta changes into nirmana, or sasmtta, citta, or a sense of sattvic individuality, and nature makes the intelligence wise, which in turn keeps the consciousness pure.  This sutra explains the quality of constructive and creative mind through asmita. The seat of the mind-matter is the brain. It produces fluctuations, bias and prejudices, which cause pain and distress, and need to be held back.  The mind at its source is single and pure. It is known as the core of the being (atman) or the seat of the spiritual heart. When it sprouts into a seedling, it becomes the self-conscious centre (antahkarana), and forms sasmita or a sense of sattvic individuality. This develops into consciousness {citta), which branches out into ego (ahamkara), intelligence (buddhi) and mind (manas). These manifest themselves as multiple thought-waves, which, if allowed free play, give rise to sufferings and waverings (vyutthana citta).  By regular practice, the fire of yoga develops the sadhaka's ability to discriminate between the original mind and its offshoots, single mind and multifaceted, complex mind. He does this by careful observation of his behaviour, channelising his energies to retrace the source of these thought-waves (citta vrttis) and exterminate them at their very source. This is santa citta or samahita citta, which takes the sadhaka to the threshold of the single state of consciousness, and converts the sprouted or created consciousness into a cultured consciousness - nirmana citta. This, in turn, traces the core of his individual existence. This becomes meditation - dhyana, at which point the distortions of the multiple mind disappear. The conscious awareness of head and heart unite, and the consciousness becomes mature and pure (divya ana). This pure citta is the root consciousness - miila citta. For instance, one can compare the single state of consciousness to the trunk of a tree and the multiple minds to the branches of the tree. Though these branches shoot out from the main trunk, they remain in contact with it. Similarly, the sadhaka has to draw back the branches of consciousness, i e., the 'I' consciousness, from the head towards its base, so as to lose its identity.  Asmita (ego) is the first branch growing from the tree whose roots are bound in avidya (wrong understanding) As with the other four klesa-s, asmita builds a wall between our true self and the false self. When we attach ourselves to our job title, role, bank account, house size, physical ability and the like we are seeing ourselves through the false self. The curtain is drawn preventing the light from shining through. When the false self is the one we relate to the most we will experience suffering, unease, states that can lead us down the path of depression or negative emotions (or injury in the yoga class!). We all know false identification is easy to fall into in our world. There is so much to distract us and draw us outwards, away from what is deep inside.  Consciously exploring who we really are takes work. Practices like yoga or other meditative disciplines can assist to filter out the rubbish we accumulate in our minds and draw back the curtain that is covering the light. Then our own truth can be revealed.  There are five colorings or kleshas (2.3), and that these emerge sequentially. First is avidya, or ignorance (2.4, 2.5), and then comes I-ness, individuality or asmita (2.6). Then after there is an individuality, it starts to take on, or wrap itself (1.4) in all sorts of attractions (2.7) and aversions (2.8). Finally, once all of this false identity has been assumed, there is the fear of the loss of those identities (2.9). In such a way, the mind emerges out of the subtler form. The advanced yogi has mastery even over this process of mind emerging out of the root I-ness or asmita.  All these artificially constructed minds have actually evolved from our ego or the feeling of I-ness.  This Ego stands at the center of the artificial minds and goes on inflating the artificial minds in all directions.  This artificial, constructed minds create thoughts, feelings, relationships, societies to live-in, our mutual likes and dislikes and our whole life pattern.  Our mind-fields consisting of all of our thoughts, memories, feelings etc are all constructed by our asmita or Ego identity only. The I-ness in us is directly responsible for all of our sinful and sacred acts. Likewise, all of our thoughts and memories spring from this I-ness thought only.  But, Yogi can construct the type of I-ness identities that serve him well in his endeavours from the same Asmita itself.  Behind all created mind-fields, there is also a mind-field, which is original and not created by our Egos. We have come to this world with this uncreated, original mind-field. The whole effort of Sadhaka is to reach the clean slate of this uncreated, original mind-field.  With exceptional mental faculties an individual can influence the mental state of other beings. The Purusa itself is never changed. Whatever you do never destroys your own glory, your own nature, because the soul cannot be acted upon by anything, only a veil is spread before it, hiding  its perfection.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.5 : प्रवृत्तिभेदे प्रयोजकं चित्तमेकमनेकेषाम्॥५॥
  • 5. Pravṛttibhede prayojakam cittamekamanekeṣām.
  • Consciousness is one, but it branches into many different types of activities and innumerable thought-waves.
  • Consciousness, though single, directs multiple thoughts, sometimes creating discrepancies between words and deeds. It is indirectly responsible for several activities, and becomes the source of desires and their satisfaction. If it stops directing thoughts, the need to culture the consciousness towards transformation (nirmana citta) does not arise. Patanjali wants everybody to channelise the energies of the multiple mind in the right direction, so that no discrepancies or distortions arise among words, thoughts and deeds. It has already been said that multiple thoughts arise from the sense of ' I' consciousness in the sphere of activity. Owing to lack of understanding - avidya, their fluctuations create doubts, confusion, desires and avarice, bringing sufferings that disturb the mind. These are 'weeds' of the mind (vyutthana or nirmita citta). By using the discriminative faculty (mrodha citta) gained through yoga, and analysing the fluctuating changes, the weeds are eradicated and a state of silence (prasanta citta), is created - an intermediate state between the original, universal mind and the individual mind. In that state of silence, comes a refining and purifying spark from within (divya citta). When this occurs, nature becomes a real friend to consciousness culturing and transforming it, with its abundant energies, and cleansing the intelligence of the heart. Intelligence and consciousness then realise that they are one, not disconnected and different, and all sorrows and joys reach a culmination. The ego-centred and ego-based mind-fields that the Sadhaka constructs consciously, to serve him may exhibit diverse tendencies and may look like many mind-fields. But, in reality, there is a single root mind-field behind all of them, which controls all these diverse external expressions or mind-fields. This means, we have come with an original mind-field, which is the real controller behind all the diverse mind-fields that the EGO goes on creating. While the activities of the emergent mind fields may be diverse, the one mind is the director of the many. The root aspect of mind that emerges from individuality or asmita  is the core out of which there may emerge many clusters of mental identity. All of the mental constructs of who we think we are, are false identities that are secondary to that central mental identity.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.6 : तत्र ध्यानजमनाशयम्॥६॥
  • 6. Tatra dhyānajam anāśayaṁ.
  • Of these activities of consciousness of perfected beings, only those, which proceed from meditation, are free from latent impressions and influences.
  • Having explained the creation by the single mind of multiple thoughts, which disturb the poise of the original mind, Patanjali explains here that this sprouted mind should be cultured, tranquillised and silenced through profound meditation. This puts an end to the influence of impressions, and liberates the consciousness from entanglements with objects seen, heard or known. Meditation not only liberates consciousness from past impressions, but also removes the hindrances towards progressive evolution of the mind. Impressions of attachment and affliction continue to torture others. These obstacles, lust, anger, greed, infatuation, pride and jealousy, are the spokes of the emotional wheel. Meditation assists to subdue them, so that the emotional centre (the consciousness of the heart) can expand in a new dimension of spiritual growth. Then consciousness will have neither merits nor demerits, virtue nor vice, fluctuations nor afflictions. It becomes 'cultured' (samahita citta), and is conducive in experiencing kjnalya. When the constructed mind-fields are many, amongst them, the one born out of Meditation is the one which is free from the Karmic impressions of the past.  In meditation, we dissolve all other mind-fields. Only one original mind, with which we are born cannot be dissolved by us in mediation. It is the purest, in which we find no further reflections of other mind-fields. From childhood, all impressions that were absorbed by us as different mind-fields, will have to be dissolved, just as we peel of layers of onion skin, to find nothing remaining at the end of the peeling process. The original mind has neither any  past impressions in it nor has it anything about the future. The whole process of meditation to attain kaivalya is to dissolve these past and future impressions constantly and keep the mind steady in its original state. All thinking stops in this process. Because, all thinking essentially relates you to either the past or the future but not to the reality of the present. Even the future is nothing but a projection of all past experiences into the future. Nothing exists in the future without a basis from the past. If past is got rid of, future also dissolves, because, it loses all of its past base. If both the past and the future lose their appeal for the mind and dissolve from its attention – then the present arises forcefully, beautifully like an eternity in itself. In the present, all desires vanish. We need to recognize that all desires essentially pertain to future. They neither pertain to past nor to the present. When the meditation is only on the present – mind-field becomes totally devoid of any karma. It will be the original one you got at birth; it will be devoid of desires. All meditation must be done in a very, relaxed, playful way, because, all seriousness relates to and comes along with the past. Leave all seriousness. Keep playful, pleasant and unburdened by past and future. Then, Meditation becomes real and easy. Then, Meditation frees the Mind from any of the remaining desires in it easily.  The thing to cultivate is the mind of a meditator, which is free from stored impressions and the play of karma. Influence on another by one whose mind is in a state of dhyana can never increase anxiety or other obstacles. In fact, they are reduced. Until a yogi gets clarity of consciousness he cannot transcend his feelings.   He is continually fooled by them.  When he masters the effortless linkage of the mind to higher realities, then he gains objectively and can sort out the endearing but harmful feelings, even the memory which is a storehouse of these.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.7 : कर्माशुक्लाकृष्णं योगिनस्त्रिविधमितरेषाम्॥७॥
  • 7. Karmāśuklākṛṣṇam yoginastrividhamitareṣām.
  • A yogi's actions are neither white nor black. The actions of others are of three kinds - white, black or grey.
  • This sutra speaks of three types of actions and their effects on an average individual, but there are in fact four. The fourth is free, uncoloured and pure. The yogi follows this kind of action to be free from its fruits. The unmixed actions of the yogi are beyond sattva, rajas and tamas. They yield no positive or negative reactions in consciousness and hence are free from duality. This fourth type of action is propitious and auspicious. This is the real 'skill in action' of the yogi .An average person is saturated with ambitious thoughts. He desires rewards for his deeds, but forgets that they carry the seeds of pain. If his ambition is transformed into spiritual aspiration, he loses interest in rewards and comes to understand sadhana for the sake of sadhana, or action for the sake of action. He becomes refined; his mind and consciousness become clear and his actions clean. He collects no impressions. He takes future births only to cleanse himself of past-accumulated impressions. He anchors his mind and consciousness unreservedly to the will of the divine. All his actions are free from the seeds of reactions. Of all discussions on how to belong to the world, act in it and yet remain unsullied; pride of place is often given to the debate between Lord Krishna and Arjuna on the eve of battle. There, Krishna makes it clear that action cannot be avoided; because inaction is also action; and that selfish actions, and attachment to their fruits, lead to entrapment. With respect to this triumph of world literature and philosophy, the Bhagavad Gita, one must acknowledge that in this sutra, Patanjali, in his usual crisp style, has said exactly the same thing. Not even the superbly expressive style of the Gita can eclipse Patanjali's intelligence in going straight to the heart of the matter. How does a free man act, and yet remain free? This is the main thrust of the kaivalya pada. Here Patanjali evidently states that free action, beyond causality, is his who acts without motive or desire - as if a kite were released in the sky, without a string to bring it back to earth. Actions of all Human beings are called karmas. They arise from  vasanas, which are deep, innate, in-built impressions or deep rooted tendencies or habits which prompt us to go in for different karmas, again and again. They urge, drive, command and force us to go in and do this, or that action, though most of us fail to recognize them as the our inbuilt vasanas. These actions can be good, bad or a third type which is neither good nor bad. But, a Yogi’s actions do not arise from the old, innate vasanas (tendencies) or as karma phalam. Therefore they are neither good nor bad, neither pure nor impure. Yogi goes on doing his work - without seeking its fruit to himself. When the karma phalam is not desired by him for himself, the karma itself does not bind him as sin(paap) or good (Punya). While most aspirants have the habit of black, white, or mixed actions leading to consequences, a new habit can gradually be formed. Recall that one of the two foundation principles is vairagya, or non-attachment . As non-attachment gradually comes through the many practices, this habit of coloring with consequences lessens. Gradually, there are fewer consequences or colorings (kleshas), which come from actions.    An advanced yogi who has mastered the dhyana effortless linkage of the mind to a higher reality, may perform cultural activities, just as others do but for him, these do not result in rewarding, penalizing nor fruitless results.  What then does the yogi gain from cultural activities?   He gains absolutely nothing, because his detachment allows the reactions to fall back into material nature without a claimant.When the Yogi has attained to that state of perfection, the actions of that man, and the Karma produced by those actions, will not bind him, because he did not desire them.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.8 : ततस्तद्विपाकानुगुणानामेवाभिव्यक्तिर्वासनानाम्॥८॥
  • 8. Tatastadvipākānuguṇānāmevābhivyaktirvāsanānām.
  • These three types of actions leave impressions which become manifest when conditions are favourable and ripe.
  • Of the four kinds of action, the first three leave behind potential residues, which are accumulated as impressions in the memory. Memories generate desires, and the results of desires in turn grow to be memories. They move together and form dormant impressions, which, according to their maturity, either manifest immediately or remain dormant; to appear unexpectedly later in this life or in future lives. Desire is the propelling force, which stimulates the body and mind and strives for satiation. Desires and their fulfilment bind consciousness to the threefold actions. Desire and memory compel the mind to act for their gratification, determining one's future class of birth, span of life, and the kinds of experiences to be undergone. If the impressions are good, they create situations favourable to spiritual life. Unfavourable impressions bind one to lust, anger, greed, infatuation, pride and envy, creating perturbations in the consciousness. But even then, if one turns one's consciousness towards the seer by sincerely and deferentially following the eightfold path of yogic discipline, one's actions will no longer be of the threefold type, but of the fourth, which do not give rise to desire for fruits or rewards. This is the literal meaning of 'Yogah karmasu kausalam', 'skill of yogic action'. Karma (action), the creation of its vasanas in our mind, and the vasanas propelling us into karma of a similar type that created the vasana – these go on occurring in our minds in cycles. This is a karmic cycle. Why do we do a particular type of good, bad or neutral type deed? Because, vasanas of the same type are holding our mind in their power and urging our mind to act in the same or similar manner again and again. When we again do a karma on their influence, that karma again creates further vasanas relating to it, which join their similar vasanas already in our minds and strengthens the them. These strengthened vasanas again propel us into similar deeds, which create similar vasanas again; which go out and join their predecessor vasanas again. Thus karmic cycle goes on and on – until an awareness dawns on us. Those threefold actions result in latent impressions (vasanas) that will later arise to fruition only corresponding to those impressions. Impressions match the actions: Whether actions are white, black, or mixed, the resulting deep impressions (vasana) will also be of a similar nature. They too will be white, black, or mixed. When those deep impressions once again arise to the surface, driving further actions, speech, and thoughts, those too will have similar leanings. They can be altered through sadhana (spiritual practices) and deciding to follow different courses of actions. Of these [actions], only those vasanas (subconscious impressions) for which there are favorable conditions for producing their fruits will manifest in a particular birth. Because the tendency of the mind to act on the basis of the five obstacles, such as misapprehension, has not been erased, they will surface in the future to produce their unpleasant consequences.    Everything in the material creation works according to innate tendency, manifesting according to time and place.  Sometimes it takes thousands of years before something can manifest or be given any type of satisfaction. Desires can only manifest themselves in proper environments. Only those desires will come out for which the environment is fitted; the rest will remain stored up. In this life we have many  godly desires, many human desires, many animal desires.  Only that Karma which is suited to and fitted for the environments will come out. These proves that the power of environment is the great check to control even Karma itself.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.9 : जातिदेशकालव्यवहितानामप्यानन्तर्यं स्मृतिसंस्कारयोरेकरूपत्वात्॥९॥
  • 9. Jāti deśa kāla vyavahitānām apyānantaryam smṛti saṁskārayorekarūpatvāt.
  • Life is a continuous process, even though it is demarcated by race, place and time. Due to the uninterrupted close relationship between memory and subliminal impressions, the fruits of actions remain intact from one life to the next, as if there were no separation between births.
  • As per Sanatana Dharma , the law of karma functions uninterruptedly throughout successive lifetimes, though each life is separated by rank, place and time. Desires and impressions are stored in the memory and link the behavioural patterns of previous lives with present and future lives. The theory of karma, or the law of cause and effect, is explained to inspire the sadhaka which will release him from the desires and results which are simply the accumulated actions of his previous lives. In the previous sutra, the common identity of latent habitual impressions and memories was pointed out. Memories and impressions are interrelated, interconnected, interwoven. They act as stimuli in the present life. Even if previous lives are divided by social condition, status, time and place, the oneness of memory and impression flashes consciously, subconsciously or unconsciously and moulds the pattern of the present life. For instance, if a man's life has taken shape after undergoing many lives in the form of other species, memory and impressions at once connect the past to the present life even though the interval between them may be a long one. One can thus conclude that the seed of future lives is planted in the present life, 'As you sow, so shall you reap: we are responsible in this life for moulding our future lives'. The theory of karma, far from being a fatalistic theory of 'predestination', as many people misunderstand it to be, serves to make one aware of his/her responsibilities and one's power to affect the future course of one's life. It acts as a guide, inspiring one to perform virtuous actions which will gradually lead one towards the expertise of performing desireless actions. Theory of Karma kicks in only when the soul enters a human body. Once a soul enters a conscious human body it does not revert back into an animal in the next birth. Our vasanas do not leave us merely because we go to a different place; stay in a different period or even become a living being of a different type.  Our changing a residence from one place to another is not going to remove our innate habits or vasanas. When we grow older and older, the time changes, but our vasanas become stronger, because, vasanas result in karma, which further creates vasanas, which results in strengthening the already existing vasanas in us. Even if we die and take re-birth in a different human race, our vasanas come along with us – as if they are a continuity. We carry them along wherever we go.  Soul samskaras don’t die, even when we do. Since memory (smriti) and the deep habit patterns (samskaras) are the same in appearance, there is an unbroken continuity in the playing out of those traits, even though there might be a gap in location, time, or state of life. Memory and predisposition are in alignment: Because the process of remembering (smriti) and the underlying predispositions (samskaras) are in alignment, when the right opportunities arise, those two, once again, begin to play out in the actions in the external world. It is as if there was no break, no gap, although there was. You simply pick up where you left off. Feeling of doing something before: It is very common for people to have deja vu experiences, where it seems like something is familiar, some place, people, circumstance, or activity. One of the ways this can happen is this process of memory and samskara matching, and of continuity in the playing out of the actions (karmas). The circumstances might not literally be the same, but the process of unfolding karma is unbroken in the way described here, thus leading quite naturally to the feeling of familiarity. : Imagine that you are working on some project at your job, but that it is interrupted by a vacation of a few weeks. When you return to work, you pick up where you left off. Two things were there. First, you had memory (smriti) of what you were doing, and second, you had a driving force (samskara) in you to complete the project. Both of these were similar to one another. Although there was a gap in time (the vacation), the project went on when you returned, just as if you had not been away.  Imagine that you died and were reborn in a new body, at some future time, and in a different place. You would have memories, though possibly vague or unconscious, and you would have latent predispositions. Although desires are separated from their fulfillments by class, space and time, they have an uninterrupted relationship because the impressions [of desires] and memories of them are identical. Life is a continuous process, even though it is demarcated by race, place and time. Due to the uninterrupted close relationship between memory and subliminal impressions, the fruits of actions remain intact from one life to the next, as if there were no separation between births. Memory and latent impressions are strongly linked. This link remains even if there is an interval of time, place, or context between similar actions. Acquired soul samskaras become the cause of action in that body.  Deep rooted phobias can only be amputated by past life regression.  There is NO modern medicine for this.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻



  • 4.10 : तासामनादित्वं चाशिषो नित्यत्वात्॥१०॥
  • 10. Tāsāmanāditvam cāśiṣo nityatvāt.
  • These impressions, memories and desires have existed eternally, as the desire to live is eternal.
  • Just as the universe is eternal, so are impressions and desires. They have existed from the distant past, beyond anybody's memory. For one whose seeds of blemishes are eliminated, and whose desires have come to an end, the turmoils of the universe appear to have come to an end. Nobody knows the timeless, primordial, absolute One, or when the world came into existence. Both purusa and prakrti, spirit and nature, existed before man appeared. When creation took place, man was empowered with consciousness, intelligence, mind, senses of perception, organs of action and body. At the same time the characteristics or qualities (gunas) of nature, illumination (sattva), action (rajas) and inertia (lamas) entered man's body. Set on the wheel of time with the spokes of the gunas of nature, man began to function in conformity with these three fundamental, intermingling qualities. Though born with an unpolluted heart, he gradually became caught in the snare of nature and fell victim to the polarities of pleasure and pain, good and evil, love and hatred, the permanent and transient. That is how desires (vasana) and imprints (samskara) rooted themselves in man's life, and why this sutra says that desires have existed from time immemorial. Caught in these reverses, man felt the need of a personal divinity, unaffected by afflictions, untouched by actions and reactions, and free from the experience of joy and sorrow. This led to a search for the highest ideal embodied in purusa, or God. Through this search arrived culture, and finally civilization. Man learned to differentiate between good and evil, virtue and vice, and what is moral and immoral. That is how yoga was discovered. Through yoga sadhana, the desires that have existed since the beginning of time are eliminated so that kaivalya can be experienced. In II.12, Patanjali explained that the causes of actions are hidden, accumulated impressions of one's past deeds. In this chapter he speaks of pure actions, which collect and store no imprints. The essential nature of citta is tranquillity - santa citta. When the sadhaka does not permit thought-waves to arise (vyutthana citta), naturally there is no need for their restraint, nirodha citta. As both are filtered by santa citta, the sadhaka resides in this quiet state and performs his duties. His actions are pure, and their outcome too will be pure.. Due to ignorance, joy and sorrow occur and deepen, according to one's surroundings. If allowed free rein, they agitate the serene state of consciousness and the gates of kaivalya may remain closed forever. But one can sever the links of desires by developing the mind through the grace of yoga. As long as one practices yoga, one is free from desire. Dedicated, life-long practice of yoga stops the wheel of desires, so that one lives in the state of poise and peace. Desires started is us – when we started our life journey. They are born along with us. It emanates from our will to live. Patanjali says that desires and their innate vasanas have no beginning.  But, he has not said that they do not have an end. If we recognize the nature and consequences of desire, vasanas, and the consequent karmas and karmaphalam – Patanjali shows us the way out of their cycle. Samadhi is essentially intended to end this cycle. There is no beginning to the process of these deep habit patterns (samskaras), due to the eternal nature of the will to live.  The will to live is the primordial out-flowing of the urge to manifest. This eternal process of cause and effect means that there is also no beginning to the process of deep habit patterns (samskaras) springing forth into thoughts and actions, and their subsequent creation of memories and impressions . The cycling process of deep impressions, actions, consequences, and storage of memories is without beginning. Self-realization is not from regression analysis: Therefore, the approach to Self-realization is other than tracing back our individual personality development in some linear regression of cause preceding effect. In some approaches of psychological examination this might be a valid method, but not in the case of seeking enlightenment. In spiritual matters, it ultimately provides little fruit to try to figure out how we got to our present circumstances. It is far better to seek the direct experience of the eternal core of our being, regardless of the nature of the wrappings of false identities. With the removal of obstacles, that realization naturally flows. Those memories and impressions are primeval, without a beginning, hope and desire energies are eternal as well. When a yogi sees that the hope and desire energy is eternal, he makes a decision to let it be and to detach himself from the urges.  He must, by all means, get himself separated from the mento-emotional force or remain a victim of it.  The memories and the circumstance-forming impressions will be there for all eternity.   A yogin has no choice but to extract his existence from the realm of it.

    ༺ ࿘ ॐ ࿗ ༻