॥४॥ कैवल्यपाद - 4. Kaivalya Pāda - Liberation



results: 21 - 30 of 34 from chapter 4

  • 4.21 : चित्तान्तरदृश्ये बुद्धिबुद्धेरतिप्रसङ्गः स्मृतिसंकरश्च॥२१॥
  • 21. Cittāntara dṛśye buddhibuddheratiprasaṅgḥ smṛtisaṁkaraśca.
  • If consciousness were manifold in one's being, each cognising the other, the intelligence too would be manifold, so the projections of mind would be many, each having its own memory.
  • Plurality of consciousness would result in lack of understanding between one mind and another, leading to utter confusion and madness. Patanjali thus concludes that consciousness is one and cannot be many.  As a tree has numerous branches, all connected to the trunk, similarly, the various wavelengths of thoughts are connected to a single consciousness. This consciousness remains unadulterated and divine at its source in the spiritual heart. When it branches from the source towards the head, it is called created consciousness - nirmita citta, which, being fresh, is inexpert and uncultured. The moment it comes into contact with objects, it becomes tainted, creating moods in the thought-waves. These moods are the five fluctuations (vntis) and five afflictions (klesas) . Moods should not be mistaken for a plurality of minds. The mind stays the same, but moods generate an illusion of several minds. If the minds were really many, then each would have its own memory and intelligence. This becomes outrageous. Just as a room fitted with mirrors baffles the onlooker, similarly, the idea of many minds causes confusion and irrationality. The practice of yoga disciplines and cultures the consciousness of the head, by which it perfects the art of analysis (savitarka), judges precisely (savicara), experiences unalloyed bliss (ananda), becomes auspicious (sasmi-ta) and moves towards mature intelligence (consciousness of the heart) and unalloyed wisdom (rtambhara prajna).  If one mind were illumined by another, as its master, then there would be an endless and absurd progression of cognitions, as well as confusion. The Yogi seeks only pure consciousness: Since the mind is not self-illuminating, and there is not endless chain of minds, the Yogi seeks only to have the direct experience of the pure consciousness or purusha . If consciousness were manifold in one's being, each cognizing the other, the intelligence too would be manifold, so the projections of mind would be many, each having its own memory. Unless there is a spirit behind a mind, there would be no perception in that energy.

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  • 4.22 : चितेरप्रतिसंक्रमायास्तदाकारापत्तौ स्वबुद्धिसंवेदनम्॥२२॥
  • 22. Citerapratisaṁkramāyāstadākārāpattau svabuddhisaṁvedanam.
  • Consciousness distinguishes its own awareness and intelligence when it reflects and identifies its source - the changeless seer - and assumes his form.
  • Through the attainment of pure consciousness comes knowledge of the unchangeable seer, who rests on his own intelligence and nowhere else.  When consciousness no longer fluctuates, then its pure nature surfaces to comprehend itself. Consciousness has two facets - one pure, divine and immutable, the other changeable, transient and exhibitive. It has no light of its own but acts as a medium or agent between the seer and the objects seen. Due to ignorance, it does not realise that it is impersonating the seer. But the seer has knowledge of the movements of the consciousness.  When one facet of consciousness ceases to operate, it ends its contact with the external world and stops collecting impressions. The other facet is drawn to the seer, and the two unite. Intelligence and consciousness fuse in their abode - the atman, and the soul comes face to face with itself.  A dirty mirror mists reflection; a clean mirror reflects objects clearly. The illumined consciousness becomes purified and reflects objects exactly as they are. The reflector is called bimba-pratibimba vada, or the elucidation of double reflection. There is no difference between the source object and the reflected image. The soul reflects the soul. It is the fulfilment of yoga; Citta is identified with the seer. This is svabuddhi samvedanam or intuitive understanding of the inner voice.  An everyday instance of human consciousness taking on the absolute quality and form of the object one observes is when one gazes into the dancing flames of a fire, or at the waves of the sea, or the wind on the tree-tops. One feels absolutely engrossed in watching, without thought or impatience, as if one was the unending waves or the flickering flames, or the windswept trees. Chitta by itself has no illuminating power or power of cognition. That Power rests with the Purusha or Consciousness. Purusha is at once self-illuminating and one who illuminates the mind as well. Purusha does not operate  by himself to experience the world of objects.  Purusha experiences the whole world, only through the mind, which operates through the senses. But, Purusha does not need another illuminator for itself. Purusha stays as the witness of all that the mind projects through mind itself. Purusha however undergoes no changes whatsoever by all these inputs from the mind. He remains the unchanging witness. When the mind stays very pure, without the usual colouring of the senses, it receives the illumination from Purusha to the fullest extent, and the cognition process is in its finest form. This means that Chitta now remains clean and clear and unwavering. Then, the Chitta’s awareness of the process of cognition also is at its peak. It poses no hindrances before the final witness of the Purusha in the cognition process. When the unchanging consciousness appears to take on the shape of that finest aspect of mind-field, then the experience of one's own cognition process is possible.  Consciousness provides the light or life force so that the subtlest aspect of mind-stuff can operate, yet like with the mirror, it cannot itself be grasped and is unchanging. It is as if the consciousness, though unchanged, wraps itself around the subtle object called mind, and, in turn, all of the objects of the mind. This has been described in the beginning of the Yoga Sutras as the essential obstacle to be transcended, or disidentified with.  The tool must be set aside: By realizing the extremely subtle nature of how the consciousness allows the mind-field to be active, it is evident that to know the absolute, unchanging Truth or Reality, one must let go of even this finest instrument. Through that letting go, the experience of the unchanging, eternal consciousness is there, standing alone, and this is the experience of Self-realization. It is the meaning of resting in one's True nature that is introduced in the beginning of the Yoga Sutras . The consciousness of the Purusha is unchangeable; by getting the reflection of it, the mindstuff becomes conscious of the Self. Consciousness distinguishes its own awareness and intelligence when it reflects and identifies its source -- the changeless seer -- and assumes his form. The pure consciousness of the Atman is unchangeable. As the reflection of its consciousness falls upon the mind, the mind takes the form of the Atman and appears to be conscious. When the mind is not linked to external objects and it does not respect an external form to the Perceiver, then it takes the form of the Perceiver itself. Patanjali says that knowledge is not a quality of the Purusa. When the mind comes near the Purusa it is reflected, as it were, upon the mind, and the mind, for the time being, becomes knowing and seems as if it were itself the Purusa.

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  • 4.23 : द्रष्टृदृश्योपरक्तं चित्तं सर्वार्थम्॥२३॥
  • 23. Draṣṭṛ dṛśyoparaktam cittam sarvārtham.
  • Consciousness, reflected by the seer as well as by the seen, appears to be all-comprehending.
  • Consciousness, being in conjunction both with the seer and the seen, appears to an average individual to be all pervading, omniscient and real. When one is cultured and purified, one realises that consciousness has no existence of its own but is dependent on the seer. As the physical frame is the body of consciousness, therefore consciousness is the body of the seer. Consciousness is the bridge between nature and soul, and its conjunction is either illumined by the seer or tainted by the seen. The wise yogi frees consciousness from the qualities of nature; he keeps it clean, so that it is reflected without distortion both by the seer and the seen. When the waves of the sea subside, they lose their identities and become the sea. In the same way, when the waves of the seer - the senses of perception, mind, intelligence and consciousness - subside, they lose their identities and merge in the ocean of the seer, for the seer to blaze forth independently. This is the sight of the soul. In iv.22, Patanjali explains that consciousness is no longer a subject but an object. It is not a knower but the known. As it is trained by sadhana towards maturity (paripakva citta), it gains purity (suddha citta) through pure intelligence (iuddha buddhi).  Until now, consciousness was under the impression that it was the reflector (bimba) and all other images were its reflected reflections (pratibvhba). This sutra explains that consciousness in its immature state takes itself to be all-powerful and all-pervading, but the truth is that the seer is actually the reflector. Patanjali illustrates that the impersonating consciousness is transformed to the level of the seen, so that both the reflector and its reflection, gitta, are identical.  It is said in the Bhagavad Gita (vi.19) that as a lamp in a windless place does not flicker, so the sheaths of a cultured yogi do not shake. They remain untouched by the wind of desires for the seer to reflect his own glorious light, atmajyoti, and to dwell in that light - purusa jnana. Purusha is the seer and the witness of all that is seen. All objects received through the senses and the mind are the seen. Chitta or mind receives the inputs and presents before Purusha. On one side,Chitta is colored by the Purusha. On the other side, it is coloured by the objects outside, the Drisya. Then, the dual colouring on it makes the comprehending process self-enabled and clear. Mind always remains the medium through which the Purusha witnesses the world. The mind can now know all that can be known. It can know everything that can be known. But, in reality, it is only a medium and the actual knower remains the Purusha. For Patanjali, the Purusha, who rules from behind the mind, the mind itself, the world  outside and the whole cognizing process are all real. Maya enters in when Purusha’s existence is not understood and mind starts thinking that it is the actual seer. Therefore, the mind field, which is colored by both seer and seen, has the potential to perceive any and all objects. Coloured by the seer and the seen the mind is able to understand everything. The mind is able to perceive because it reflects both the Atman and the objects of perception. The mind field, which is colored by both seer and seen, has the potential to perceive any and all objects.

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  • 4.24 : तदसंख्येयवासनाभिश्र्चित्रमपि परार्थं संहत्यकारित्वात्॥२४॥
  • 24. Tad asaṁkhyeyavāsanābhiścittamapi parārtham saṁhatyakāritvāt.
  • Though the framework of consciousness is interwoven with innumerable desires and subconscious impressions, it exists for the seer on account of its proximity to the seer as well as to the objective world.
  • Though consciousness has been fogged with impressions (samskaras) throughout eternity, its aim is not only to satisfy the desires of the senses (bhoga), but also to further the emancipation (apavarga) of the soul. Consciousness is tied by a hidden force both to the seer and to nature. It is well equipped to reach the seer, though it has no ambition of its own except to serve its Lord. Consciousness has innumerable inclinations and impressions derived from memory, among which longing for pleasures and freedom from pleasures stand out. They are desired impressions. From this, it becomes clear that consciousness, being close to nature and spirit, feels that it does not exist for its own sake but for the sake of purusa and prakrti.. Once consciousness is cultured through yogic discipline, it becomes matured and illumined. It realises that the seer is not interested in objects of pleasure and opts to serve with disengagement. Now that it comprehends its inner value, it realises the triviality of nature's pleasures and turns towards the path of Self-Realisation. Thus transformed, it begins its journey towards emancipation. If one's karmas are good, they awaken curiosity and guide it towards the path of kaivalya; they reward one's effort with the vision of the soul. Yogic practices speed up this process, beginning with the conquering of the body and ending in the vision of the soul.  This is salvation.  For most modern scientists (who have NO access to the wisdom of the Vedas ) mind appears to be the master, which receives numerous inputs through senses, synthesizes them and understands them. But, mind is not the master. It is just an efficient manager. It is always working for the Purusha, the pure consciousness. The master never appears in the forefront. But, the power of illumination belongs to the Master. The mind receives only a reflection of this power, to receive the numerous impressions of the world outside. One must understand the process very clearly and keep the mind as an efficient manager working for the self, which is the Purusha, the pure consciousness. The Purusha may be a mere witness, the ultimate seer. He may have the capability to illumine himself and illumine the mind, and through the mind, the external world. But, Purusha has to operate only through the mind, which has no self illumining capability, for which it depends on the Purusha. The bridge between the Purusha and the world is the mind. That mind field, though filled with countless impressions, exists for the benefit of another witnessing consciousness, as the mind field is operating only in combination with those impressions. However subtle we go in our exploration of the depths of the mind, that mind itself gets its life force from pure consciousness, like the electricity and the computer.   The computer cant perform without electricity. This pure consciousness is the Reality that we want to experience, unalloyed even by the subtlest aspect of mental process. While the computer operates for the external user, it is the other way around with consciousness. The mind field operates for the benefit of the consciousness. Though having countless desires, the mind-stuff exists for the sake of another [the Purusha] because it an act only in association with it. Though the fabric of consciousness is interwoven with innumerable desires and subconscious impressions, it exists for the seer on account of its proximity to the seer as well as to the objective world.  This is because the mind cannot function without the power of the Perceiver. The mind is a compound of various things, and therefore it cannot work for itself.  The proximity (samhatya) of the spirit is itself, the cause of the innumerable moods and urges.

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  • 4.25 : विशेषदर्शिन आत्मभावभावनाविनिवृत्तिः॥२५॥
  • 25. Viśeṣadarśina ātmabhāva bhāvanā vinivṛttiḥ.
  • For one who realises the distinction between citta and atma, the sense of separation between the two disappears.
  • When the difference between consciousness (citta) and the projector of the consciousness (citi) is recognised, the search for Self-Realisation ends.  From iv.15 to iv.25, Patanjali takes the sadhaka progressively to the realisation that consciousness is not the all-knower, but simply an instrument of the soul.  For one who is not sure of the difference between consciousness and soul (citta and citi), an analogy is given; the blades of grass which shoot up during the rainy season prove the existence of the hidden seeds.  In this sutra Patanjali explains that the seed of the soul (atma bija) is sown at the right time for the knowledge of the soul (atma jnana) to be securely established. As one mistakes a rope for a snake at first glance, but realises upon examination that it is a rope, consciousness at this stage realises that it is not all-knowing, but an instrument of the soul. Avidya is vanquished and the practitioner thoroughly understands objective as well as subjective knowledge, without colourisation. Here all moods and modes cease to flow, and consciousness is elevated to the optimum degree to behold the inebriated state of the seer. The yogi is no longer drawn towards the temptations of the world. His search for the self ends. He becomes a master of yoga and a master of himself. He is yogesvara. This is the substance (svarupa) of yoga and a distinct attribute of the seer (visesa darsinah). For one who has experienced this distinction between seer and this subtlest mind, the false identities and even the curiosity about the nature of one's own self come to an end. After the yogi has explored the many currents and cross currents of the gross and subtle mind, there comes the realization of the separateness from all of these levels and pure consciousness. It is then, that all of these questions cease. It is not a case that they are analytically answered in logical words. Rather, the questions are resolved; they simply evaporate in understanding. Patanjali is now explaining the nature of that yogi who has realized the distinction between the seer, the seen and the mind very clearly. In other words, he is now the viveki, the one proficient in discriminating faculty; the one who can perceive the truth and differentiate it from the one which is not – easily. At this stage, the mind also is the purest possible reflector of external reality, without any coloring either on itself  or on the scenery.  The seer, the Purusha, the pure consciousness knows this. He has experienced the external reality in its purest form, since no coloring affects it now. There are now no false identities.  There is not even any further curiosity about the nature of one's own self. There is complete cessation of all doubt between the seer, the seen and the nature of mind. There is a complete cessation of any desire, including the desire to reside in the Purusha. The pure mind has come close to the Purusha and is accepting his Mastery. To one who sees the distinction between the mind and the Atman, thoughts of mind as the Atman cease forever. For one who realizes the distinction between citta and atma, the sense of separation between the two disappears. The man of discrimination ceases to regard the mind as the Atman. For one who has experienced this distinction between seer and this subtlest mind, the false identities and even the curiosity about the nature of one's own self come to an end.

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  • 4.26 : तदा विवेकनिम्नं कैवल्यप्राग्भारं चित्तम्॥२६॥
  • 26. Tadā hi vivekanimnam kaivalya prāgbhāram cittam.
  • Then consciousness is drawn strongly towards the seer or the soul due to the influence  of the exalted intelligence.
  • When the exalted intelligence is ablaze, consciousness is illumined; it becomes free and tinged with the divine (citta suddhi). Due to this divine light, citta, with its exalted intelligence, is attracted as if by a magnet towards its source - the indivisible seer who is alone, free and full. Before reaching the state of exalted intelligence, consciousness is attracted more towards the pleasures of the world. When intelligence is free from doubts and prejudices, it gravitates towards the absolute seer. As a farmer builds dykes between his fields to regulate the flow of water, similarly, exalted intelligence builds a dyke for the consciousness, so that it does not move again towards the world, but turns and flows towards union with the divine seer. This is kaivalya, an existence filled with freedom and beatitude. Such a yogi becomes a king amongst men. Viveka means clear discrimination between Truth and what is not truth. Truth liberates from ignorance, while what is not truth binds the sadhaka to Ignorance. The mind-field is always looking outward through the senses and its perception is always coloured. But, once the coloring is removed, the mind-field, the Chitta also becomes a clear, pure receiver of external wisdom because of the illuminating power that it has received from the Purusha.  Now, mind is inclined towards clear viveka or discrimination faculty in its power of perception and therefore, the ignorance binding it, comes down and down and tends to remove the veil of ignorance from the Purusha. Purusha is now shining clearly. Mind also therefore gravitates towards total liberation. What is the liberation? It is nothing but the dropping of all barriers to wisdom, the barriers to truth that had arisen in mind due to the covering of Ignorance. What is the ignorance of the mind-field? It is its identification with the body-mind complex. Once the self realizes that it is not the body-mind complex, the barriers covering the mind-field drop away easily. The mind-field should detach from the drisya and become and efficient aid of the real Master, the Prabhu, the Purusha, the self, the consciousness. Now, all barriers drop off.
    Discrimination, viveka comes home automatically. Renunciation, vairagya and liberation happen effortlessly, effectively and automatically. Then the mind is inclined towards the highest discrimination, and gravitates towards absolute liberation between seer and seen. When even the subtlest questions of life subside, there is only one direction left to go, and that is towards the realization of the absolute reality that is beyond. This is not a case of a lethargic mind having no question about the meaning of life; such a mind has not even entered the path of Self-realization. Rather, it comes from having questioned, explored, searched, and longed, through the gross, subtle, and causal levels, until finally, the point of the final discrimination stands in front of the seeker. When the mind is bent on the practice of discrimination, it moves toward liberation. And their clarity takes them to their only concern; to reach and remain in a state of freedom.  The yogi has to achieve this.  It does not come by wishful thinking.  Only through higher yoga can this be achieved consistently. Practice of Yoga leads to discriminating power, to clearness of vision. The veil drops from the eyes, and we see things as they are.  When discrimination comes by long practice fear ceases, and the mind attains isolation.

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  • 4.27 : तच्छिद्रेषु प्रत्ययान्तराणि संस्कारेभ्यः॥२७॥
  • 27. Tacchidreṣu pratyayāntarāṇi saṁskārebhyḥ.
  • Notwithstanding this progress, if one is careless during the interval, a fissure arises due to past hidden impressions, creating division between the consciousness and the seer.
  • The force of past impressions may create loopholes in the form of intellectual pride or other varying moods or modes of thought, which breach the consciousness and agitate the harmony and serenity of oneness with the pure Self (atmabhava). This sutra shows a way to fight old impressions that may influence the consciousness and crack it. Patanjali cautions that even for the supreme intelligence, the subconscious samskaras may surface in this intermediate stage and sway the consciousness. Patanjali advises yogis who wish to be released from worldly life to be incessantly vigilant in order to overcome these old habits, lest their consciousness wavers between the desire for perfection and actual perfection. The uninterrupted practice of yoga unconditionally crushes these fissures in consciousness, and eliminates doubts and prejudices, so that pure wisdom may shine. In the Bhagavad Gita 11.59, Lord Krishna says that inbuilt desire persists as a fissure even in the most austere renunciate. Only the vision of the Supreme resolves these latent faults forever. From that moment no worldly desire or temptation can endanger the composure and virtue of the yogi .Patanjali says, even at this point, there will be some very deep impressions, very deeply ingrained Samskaras, which rise again and again to pull down the viveka and put barriers in its path. This happens many times. This is because, some of these deepest, ingrained samskaras  take time and effort to be totally rooted out. The same methods already gone through for removal of samskaras must be continued to be adopted  till the last remnants are rooted out. For this, retaining a high level of awareness of them is however essential. When there are breaks or breaches in that high discrimination, other impressions arise from the deep unconscious. The clarity of discrimination can once again be clouded over. This temporary loss of the ground attained is one of the predictable obstacles of the path of enlightenment. The way to deal with this is the same as it was before the discriminative enlightenment . In the relaxation of the focus, other mind contents arise in the intervals.  These are based on subtle impressions. The yogi faces failures at every step but he must forge ahead.

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  • 4.28 : हानमेषां क्लेशवदुक्तम्॥२८॥
  • 28. Hānameṣām kleśavaduktaṁ.
  • In the same way as the sadhaka strives to be free from afflictions, the yogi must handle these latent impressions judiciously to extinguish them.
  • The gap between consciousness and the seer can rear disharmony and disturbance in one's self. As fire is deprived of fuel, likewise, the yogi has to remove the latent impressions from the consciousness and extinguish them, for it to be in harmony with the seer. Patanjali advises the yogi to eliminate disturbances by reintroducing yogic disciplines with faith, vigour and vitality. As the sadhaka earlier strove to rid himself of the sufferings of avidya, asmita, raga, dvesa and abhinivesa, the exalted yogi must, through practice, press, dry out and close the perforations in the consciousness. iv. 27 stated that subconscious impressions surface in the form of intellectual pride, which hinders progress towards the goal of union with the divine seer. As roasted seeds do not germinate, so the fire of wisdom must burn out impressions and ambitions, ending their power to generate disturbing thoughts, so that the consciousness maintains its union with the seer forever. Patanjali has taught us all the methods for removal and rooting out of kleshas like ignorance and suffering throughout the Yoga Sutras earlier. The removal of the remaining kleshas also needs to be done by the same methods.  First, you seek enough purity of mind and body that you can experience the highest. Then, after that direct experience, the way in which you relate to samskaras and karma is vastly different. You have glimpsed the highest, and knowing that, the purifying process. One must never accommodate even small errors because they are as detrimental as the five obstacles.  Each yogi has to endure and overcome this inner conflict alone.

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  • 4.29 : प्रसंख्यानेऽप्यकुसीदस्य सर्वथा विवेकख्यातेर्धर्ममेघः समाधिः॥२९॥
  • 29. Prasaṁkhyāne’pyakusīdasya sarvathā viveka khyāterdharmameghḥ samādhiḥ.
  • The yogi who has no interest even in this highest state of evolution, and maintains supreme attentive, discriminating awareness, attains dharmameghah samadhi.   He contemplates the fragrance of virtue and justice.
  • When the stream of virtue pours in torrents and the consciousness is washed clean of bias, prejudice and ambition, the light of the soul dawns. This is dharma megha samadhi - the fruit of the practice of yoga.  If the yogi, knowing that the highest form of intelligence is also a hindrance, remains uninterested even in this enlightened wisdom as well as in spiritual attainments, virtuousness descends upon him like torrential rain, washing away his individual personality. His only ambition now is to sustain spiritual health. He has purity and clarity. His personality has been transformed. He becomes humane, universal and divine. He lives forever in dharma megha samadhi, unexcelled bliss.  A cloud has two facets. It may cover the sky without bringing rain. This makes the atmosphere gloomy and people become inactive and dull. But if the cloud bursts into rain, the atmosphere is cleared, the sun shines, and people go out to work gleefully. The yogi should not make the consciousness quiet in a tamasic way, but in an alert, satvic way to shine forth brilliantly to live in the delightful, fragrant rain-cloud of virtue.  He has renounced everything, and is a viveki (one who distinguishes the invisible soul from the visible world), ajnanin (sage), a vairagin (renunciate), and a bhaktan (divine devotee). Now he has attained nirbija Samadhi.  Omniscience or total knowledge is what man seeks to attain as the highest state possible for him. But, for yogi, even this omniscient state holds no interest at all. He does not hanker for it, nor does he feel proud when he knows he has it. Thereby, the yogi exhibits the highest possible state of discrimination. The Samadhi which he is in, in  this state is called Dharma Megha Samadhi, or the Samadhi of the cloud of virtue. This renouncement of the exalted state of omniscience is called paravairagya or the ultimate renunciation. One can renounce all desires – and go on desiring for moksha. But, one can renounce even this desire for moksha. This is the state of absolute desirelessness. No desires what so ever – no desire even for Moksha. The desire for Moksha, or liberation is the ultimate desire and even this desire is renounced to make desirelessness complete.  This state is the state of the ultimate discrimination. And the yogi will now be in this state forever. Patanjali calls this state as Dharma Megha Samadhi. Dharma means virtues, megha means clouds; Samadhi means the still, flickerless state at the end of dharana and dhyana. This dharma megha is going to remain flickerless and still with the yogi.  Dharma means virtues. All virtues have descended on the Yogi like a cloud from the sky. And, they will now remain still and flickerless with the Yogi. Why is this Samadhi called a cloud? This cloud also covers the vision of the Yogi from the clear sky of kaivalya.  Even if it is of virtues, it still covers the essential kaivalya, his total liberation, from the Yogi. So, to that extent, this too remains as the last barrier that the yogi must come out of. When there is no longer any interest even in omniscience, that discrimination allows the samadhi, which brings an abundance of virtues like a rain cloud brings rain. : There finally comes a point where discrimination has so thoroughly set aside all which is not Self that even the interest in omniscience is seen as only relatively real and not worthy of pursuit. Then comes the highest virtues: From that non-attachment to omniscience there comes the samadhi that brings an abundance of virtues like a rain cloud brings rain. The Self may have been glimpsed before, but the colorings of the deep impressions were still there. Now even those have been transcended. Peace, bliss,  and perfect purity becomes a yogi’s  own nature, after he has  given up all  vanities of powers.

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  • 4.30 : ततः क्लेशकर्मनिवृत्तिः॥३०॥
  • 30. Tatḥ kleśa karma nivṛttiḥ.
  • Then comes the end of afflictions and of karma.
  • The effect of dharma megha samadhi is freedom, freedom from the five afflictions and fluctuations. It is the highest form of intelligence and evolution. From this rain-cloud of virtue, sufferings cease of their own accord and in their place, divine actions with no reactions flow forth like a river from the yogi. This is freedom. Avidya, the mother of afflictions, is eliminated, root and branch, along with residual subliminal impressions. The sadhaka will not deviate from the path of divinity nor perform an act that binds, hinders or preconditions his consciousness. He is free from the bondage of karma. In the Bhagavad Gita (V 1.5), Lord Krishna says that each individual has to cultivate himself to become enlightened, and to learn not to degrade himself, for the Self alone is the friend of the individual self, and the Self alone is the enemy of the egotistical self. As the light of a lamp fades as the oil runs out, so the lamp of the mind is extinguished as its fuel, the actions producing joys and sorrows, is exhausted. As nirmana citta is extinguished of its own accord, its root motivation is burnt out, leaving no opportunity for the production of effects The cycle of cause and effect is at an end, and the yogi is liberated from the grip of nature. Even in this liberated state, he will not relinquish his practices. He will continue to maintain them as a divine command, so that the freedom earned may not be lost by neglect. Patanjali says – if the yogi goes beyond even this barrier of virtuous cloud or Dharma megha, then, all the deepest impressions or samskaras in him dissolve totally and all the kleshas or sorrows, pains and afflictions cease totally and absolutely. Dharma megha Samadhi is thus the last barrier to cross for the successful yogi.After that dharma-meghah samadhi, the colorings of the kleshas and the karmas are removed. Burning the seeds of karma: This is the final dealing with the colorings (kleshas). First, the mind was stabilized . Then these colorings were reduced in their gross form , then they were dealt with in their subtle forms. These kleshas (colorings) moved through four stages of active, separated, attenuated, and then were reduced to seed form. Now, those seeds are parched, so as to not be able to grow again. First, there were glimpses of Truth, which had the effect of negating the obstacles . After a great deal of sadhana (spiritual practices), there came a temporary discriminative enlightenment that was accompanied by breaches . Now, with the neutralizing of the colorings of the samskaras that cause karma, the realization is finally firm of ground. The yogi rests in the True nature of the Self . From that samadhi all afflictions and karmas cease. After that dharma-meghah samadhi, the colorings of the kleshas and the karmas are removed. From that comes cessation of pains and works. When that cloud of virtue has come, then no more is there fear of falling, nothing can drag the Yogi down. No more will there be evils for him. No more pains  When the yogi reaches the causal level and sees the various clouds of energy (meghah) in which the dharmas or laws for righteous life, are created and maintained, he gets an ease in his higher yoga practice.  He smiles for he will never again fall into the trap of making spiritual missions to help or to save others

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